SAT Test Prep

CHAPTER 15
ESSENTIAL GRAMMAR SKILLS

Lesson 6: Pronoun Case

Pronoun Cases

Every pronoun has a case, which indicates its relationship to a verb or noun. There are four common cases.

Subjective (or nominative) pronouns (I, you, he, she, we, they, who, etc.) are used primarily as subjects of verbs.

Objective pronouns (me, you, him, her, them, whom, etc.) are used primarily as objects of verbs.

Possessive pronouns (my/mine, her/hers, their/theirs, whose, etc.) show attribution or ownership.

Reflexive pronouns (myself, yourself, himself, herself, themselves, etc.) show an object equated with the subject or show emphasis.

Subjective Pronouns

Subjective pronouns are used only as subjects of verbs or as predicate nominatives.

Although the verb isn’t written, its meaning is implied.


predicate nominative is a pronoun or noun “linked” to the subject by a linking verb. It takes the subjective case.


Example:

Objective Pronouns

Objective pronouns are used as objects of verbs or as objects of prepositions.


When you have a compound phrase like Tom and me and the coach and them, deciding the case of the pronoun is easier if you leave out the other part of the phrase.


Sheila and (her or she?) took the cab uptown.———She took the cab uptown not Her took the cab uptown.

It was made for you and (me or I?)——— It was made for me not It was made for I.

Possessive Pronouns


Don’t use the objective case when you should use the possessive case before a gerund.


The object of the verb resent is taking: the taking is what I resent, so using the objective pronoun you only confuses things. Since it’s not you whom I resent, the possessive case your makes sense.

Reflexive Pronouns


Reflexive pronouns are used in only two ways: to show that a subject and object are the same, as in “I pinched myself to make sure I wasn’t dreaming,” or to emphasize a noun or pronoun, as in “I myself would never say such a thing.” Never use a reflexive pronoun where an objective pronoun is required. Wrong: The crowd applauded Carl and myself. Right: The crowd applauded Carl and me.


Concept Review 6: Pronoun Case

1. Name four subjective pronouns: ____________________________________________________________________

2. Subjective pronouns are used as ____________________________________________________________________

or ________________________________________________________________________________________________

3. Name four objective pronouns: ______________________________________________________________________

4. Objective pronouns are used as ______________________________________________________________________

or ________________________________________________________________________________________________

5. Name four possessive pronouns: ____________________________________________________________________

6. Name four reflexive pronouns: ______________________________________________________________________

7. Reflexive pronouns are used to ______________________________________________________________________

or ________________________________________________________________________________________________

Choose the correct pronoun in each sentence below.

8. The climb was much easier for them than it was for Jeff and (I/me/myself).

9. The other contestants did not seem as confident as (he/him).

10. Within a week, George and (me/I) will have completed the project.

11. (Us/We) detectives are always careful to follow every lead.

12. Every student should make (his or her/their) own study plan.

13. They never seem to listen to the opinions of (us/we) students as they should.

Worksheet 6: Pronoun Case

Choose the correct pronoun in each sentence below.

1. The university presented the honor to David and (he/him).

2. After the game, we all agreed that no one had played harder than (he/him).

3. Justine and (me/I) have always been closest friends.

4. There is no point in (our/us) delaying the tests any longer.

5. I shall grant immortality to (he/him) who can pull the sword from the stone.

6. It seems quite clear that you and (I/me) will have to work together to solve this problem.

7. It might be hard for (him and me/he and I) to agree.

8. The other cheerleaders and (her/she) needed to practice on the weekend.

9. The tabloid media were thrilled about (him/his) making such a fool of himself in public.

10. (We/Us) and the other members debated the issue for over 2 hours.

11. The owners of the club offered my wife and (me/I) a free bottle of wine with dinner.

12. No other runner on the team could outrun (myself/me).

13. The teachers were getting tired of (him/his) constantly falling asleep in class.

14. The ballpark always held a special attraction for Dave and (I/me).

15. Our friends gave a party for Ingrid and (I/me/myself).

16. In anticipation of the trip, I bought (me/myself) a nice new suitcase.

Answer Key 6: Pronoun Case

Concept Review 6

1. I, he, she, you, we, they, who

2. subjects of verbs or predicate nominatives

3. me, him, her, you, us, them, whom

4. objects of verbs or objects of prepositions

5. my, mine, her, hers, his, your, yours, their, theirs, our, ours

6. myself, yourself, himself, herself, ourselves, themselves

7. show that the object of the verb is the same as the subject or emphasize an adjacent noun or pronoun

8. The climb was much easier for them than it was for Jeff and me. (object of a preposition)

9. The other contestants did not seem as confident as he (did). (subject of an implied verb)

10. Within a week, George and I will have completed the project. (subject of a verb)

11. We detectives are always careful to follow every lead. (subject of a verb)

12. Every student should make his or her own study plan. (possessive modifier of noun; must agree with singular antecedent)

13. They never seem to listen to the opinions of us students as they should. (object of a preposition)

Worksheet 6

1. The university presented the honor to David and him. (object of a preposition)

2. After the game, we all agreed that no one had played harder than he. (than he did: subject of an implied verb)

3. Justine and I have always been closest friends. (subject)

4. There is no point in our delaying the tests any longer. (Delaying is the object of the preposition, so the pronoun should not be objective.)

5. I shall grant immortality to him who can pull the sword from the stone. (object of a preposition)

6. It seems quite clear that you and I will have to work together to solve this problem. (subject)

7. It might be hard for him and me to agree. (object of a preposition)

8. The other cheerleaders and she needed to practice on the weekend. (subject)

9. The tabloid media were thrilled about his making such a fool of himself in public. (Making is the object of the preposition.)

10. We and the other members debated the issue for over 2 hours. (subject)

11. The owners of the club offered my wife and me a free bottle of wine with dinner. (object of a verb)

12. No other runner on the team could outrun me. (object of a verb)

13. The teachers were getting tired of his constantly falling asleep in class. (Falling is the object, so the pronoun should not be in the objective case.)

14. The ballpark always held a special attraction for Dave and me. (object of a preposition)

15. Our friends gave a party for Ingrid and me. (object of a preposition)

16. In anticipation of the trip, I bought myself a nice new suitcase. (The object and subject represent the same person, so the object should be in the reflexive case.)