SAT 2016

CHAPTER 2

DIAGNOSTIC SAT

1.   Reading Test

65 MINUTES 52 QUESTIONS

2.   Writing and Language Test

35 MINUTES 44 QUESTIONS

3.   Math Test – No Calculator

25 MINUTES 20 QUESTIONS

4.   Math Test – Calculator

55 MINUTES 38 QUESTIONS

5.   Essay (optional)

50 MINUTES 1 QUESTION

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ANSWER SHEET

Start with number 1 for each new section. If a section has fewer questions than answer spaces, leave the extra answer spaces blank. Be sure to erase any errors or stray marks completely.

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Start with number 1 for each new section. If a section has fewer questions than answer spaces, leave the extra answer spaces blank. Be sure to erase any errors or stray marks completely.

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CAUTIONUse the answer spaces in the grids below for Section 3 only if you are told to do so in your test book.

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Start with number 1 for each new section. If a section has fewer questions than answer spaces, leave the extra answer spaces blank. Be sure to erase any errors or stray marks completely.

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CAUTIONUse the answer spaces in the grids below for Section 4 only if you are told to do so in your test book.

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SECTION 5: ESSAY

You may wish to remove these sample answer document pages to respond to the practice SAT Essay Test.

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SECTION 5: ESSAY

You may wish to remove these sample answer document pages to respond to the practice SAT Essay Test.

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SECTION 5: ESSAY

You may wish to remove these sample answer document pages to respond to the practice SAT Essay Test.

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SECTION 5: ESSAY

You may wish to remove these sample answer document pages to respond to the practice SAT Essay Test.

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Reading test

65 MINUTES, 52 QUESTIONS

Turn to section 1 of your answer sheet to answer the questions in this section.

DIRECTIONS

Each passage or pair of passages below is followed by a number of questions. After reading each passage or pair, choose the best answer to each question based on what is stated or implied in the passage or passages and in any accompanying graphics.

Questions 1–10 are based on the following passage and supplementary material.

This passage is adapted from Kevin Drum, “America’s Real Criminal Element: Lead” ©2013 Mother Jones.

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1

In the first paragraph, Karl Smith’s work is presented primarily as

A)   a controversial sociological hypothesis.

B)   a warning about potentially dangerous economic trends.

C)   a useful model for conceptualizing a variety of phenomena.

D)   a potential medical solution to a persistent social problem.

2

The author suggests that promising research in the social sciences is sometimes ignored because it

A)   is not presented by authorities with the proper credentials.

B)   is not supported by controlled scientific experiments.

C)   relies on complex mathematical calculations that are not easily understood.

D)   uses historical data that are not necessarily valid in the modern era.

3

Which of the following provides the strongest evidence for the answer to the previous question?

A)   Lines 24–27 (“A recent study … later on”)

B)   Lines 49–52 (“In a 2000 paper … America”)

C)   Lines 68–72 (“Nevin is … community”)

D)   Lines 72–74 (“What’s more … speaking”)

4

According to the graph, which of the following is closest to the percent increase in violent crime in America from 1963 to 1993?

A)   600%

B)   400%

C)   75%

D)   20%

5

According to the graph, which decade of violent crime statistics provides the LEAST support to Rick Nevin’s hypothesis?

A)   1963–1973

B)   1980–1990

C)   1983–1993

D)   2003–2013

6

The author mentions “sales of vinyl LPs” (line 74) primarily as an example of

A)   another economic factor that may explain a social trend.

B)   how harmful chemicals can be spread via consumer products.

C)   a statistic that may be more coincidental than explanatory.

D)   a counterintuitive trend in consumer behavior.

7

The “complications” in line 22 are

A)   obstacles to gathering relevant data.

B)   controversies about theoretical models.

C)   challenges to the implementation of social policies.

D)   psychological problems.

8

The author characterizes the “drivers” in line 60 primarily as

A)   inadvertent abettors.

B)   unintentional heroes.

C)   greedy consumers.

D)   devious conspirators.

9

In line 49, “even better” most nearly means

A)   less controversial.

B)   more correlative.

C)   easier to calculate.

D)   more aesthetically engaging.

10

The final paragraph (lines 85–98) serves primarily to

A)   suggest topics for future research.

B)   concede a theoretical drawback.

C)   propose a novel alternative.

D)   describe a supportive implication.

Questions 11–21 are based on the following passages.

Passage 1 is adapted from an essay written by John Aldridge in 1951. ©1951 by John Aldridge. Passage 2 is adapted from Brom Weber, “Ernest Hemingway’s Genteel Bullfight,” published in The American Novel and the Nineteen Twenties. ©1971 by Hodder Education.

Passage 1

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Passage 2

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11

On which topic do the authors of the two passages most strongly DISAGREE?

A)   The economy of Hemingway’s writing

B)   The incisiveness of Hemingway’s prose

C)   The sincerity of Hemingway’s portrayals

D)   The extent of Hemingway’s reputation

12

Which pair of sentences provides the strongest evidence for the answer to the previous question?

A)   Lines 5–7 (“He was … just shot”) and lines 85–89 (“Hemingway … had value”)

B)   Lines 37–39 (“Later writers … his place”) and lines 55–56 (“Our violence … the 1920s”)

C)   Lines 24–26 (“The words … stone of life”) and lines 56–58 (“Yet … existence”)

D)   Lines 34–36 (“We had much … influence”) and lines 90–93 (“Perhaps the greatest … was ‘flowery’”)

13

Which of the following best describes how each passage characterizes Hemingway?

A)   Passage 1 portrays him as a tortured poet, but Passage 2 portrays him as a crass amateur.

B)   Passage 1 portrays him as a master of refinement, but Passage 2 portrays him as a literary revolutionary.

C)   Passage 1 portrays him as a hero, but Passage 2 portrays him as a cultural conformist.

D)   Passage 1 portrays him as an absurd warmonger, but Passage 2 portrays him as an undisciplined artist.

14

Which statement about Hemingway is supported by both passages?

A)   He was an artistic pioneer, although he was underappreciated in his time.

B)   He was a consistent practitioner of spare and evocative prose.

C)   His characters serve as archetypes for masculine adventure.

D)   His wartime narratives do not fully capture the horrors of war.

15

In line 26, the phrase “living stone” most nearly means

A)   salient experience.

B)   inevitable regret.

C)   stubborn resistance.

D)   durable memorial.

16

Lines 28–32 (“And so we … aroused in us”) suggests that many of Hemingway’s readers were inclined to

A)   emulate his adventures.

B)   resent his glorification of war.

C)   imitate his literary style.

D)   identify with his language.

17

The “lessons” mentioned in line 43 most likely include stories of

A)   transformative romantic love.

B)   confidence in the face of danger.

C)   indulgent self-examination.

D)   corporate or political ambition.

18

In line 49, the word “tottering” is intended to evoke a sense of

A)   infantile frailty.

B)   economic instability.

C)   artistic immaturity.

D)   societal upheaval.

19

The author of Passage 1 would most likely regard the statement in lines 66–67 (“Hemingway, in effect … conscience”), with

A)   journalistic detachment.

B)   grudging acquiescence.

C)   vehement disagreement.

D)   good-natured amusement.

20

Which statement provides the best evidence for the answer to the previous question?

A)   Lines 2–5 (“Like Lord … superb conviction”)

B)   Lines 28–32 (“And so … aroused in us”)

C)   Lines 34–36 (“We had much … formative influence”)

D)   Lines 39–41 (“They have rejected … own time”)

21

The author of Passage 2 suggests that, in comparison to Hemingway, Frank Lloyd Wright was relatively

A)   minimalist.

B)   iconoclastic.

C)   volatile.

D)   traditional.

Questions 22–32 are based on the following passage.

This passage is from Christopher F. Black, “The Mystery of the Strong Nuclear Force.” ©2015 by Christopher F. Black and College Hill Coaching.

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ELECTROSTATIC AND STRONG NUCLEAR FORCES BETWEEN PROTONS

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22

The primary purpose of the first paragraph (lines 1–12) is to

A)   describe a popular misconception.

B)   introduce a physical theory.

C)   suggest a scientific conundrum.

D)   present a personal account.

23

In line 7, “aloof” most nearly means

A)   impenetrable.

B)   formal.

C)   retracted.

D)   nonreactive.

24

The question in lines 10–12 (“And why … at all?”) indicates

A)   a minor curiosity to scientists exploring deeper questions.

B)   a socially significant puzzle that is unfortunately ignored in scientific circles.

C)   a humorous irony in an otherwise serious field of investigation.

D)   a central conundrum at the heart of an important scientific field.

25

Which sentence provides the best evidence for the answer to the previous question?

A)   Lines 2–5 (“But atoms … stability”)

B)   Lines 19–20 (“Even worse … an atom”)

C)   Lines 55–56 (“The pion … tweezer’s job”)

D)   Lines 68–70 (“If you’re … disappointed”)

26

In lines 13–16, the repetition of the phrase “We are” serves primarily to emphasize

A)   the predominance of certain conceptions.

B)   the personal nature of scientific research.

C)   the effectiveness of a particular analogy.

D)   the deficiencies in public education.

27

Which of the following best describes the relationship between the electrostatic force and the strong nuclear force between protons at the equilibrium point as shown in the graph?

A)   The strong nuclear force is at its maximum, but the electrostatic force is not.

B)   The strong nuclear force is at its minimum, but the electrostatic force is near its maximum.

C)   The sum of the two forces is zero.

D)   The strong nuclear force is zero and the electrostatic force is greater than 100 Newtons.

28

According to the graph, the electrostatic repulsion between two protons separated by 1.5 femtometers is closest to

A)   2 Newtons.

B)   20 Newtons.

C)   100 Newtons.

D)   1,000 Newtons.

29

The “mortal blow” (line 51) to Hideki Yukawa’s theory was the fact that

A)   the existence of pions was not confirmed by experimental evidence.

B)   pions were discovered to be massless, thereby refuting his theory that they were heavy.

C)   experiments showed pions to be ineffective in the range required by atomic theory.

D)   pions had a destabilizing effect on atomic nuclei, rather than a stabilizing one.

30

Which of the following best describes the structure of the passage as a whole?

A)   a series of intuitive illustrations of a complex physical theory

B)   a description of a technical puzzle and the attempts to solve it

C)   an account of an experimental finding and its surprising implications

D)   a historical overview of a heated scientific controversy

31

The author’s writing style is particularly notable for its use of all of the following EXCEPT

A)   rhetorical questions.

B)   illustrative metaphors.

C)   technical specifications.

D)   appeals to common intuition.

32

In line 68, “ties up” most nearly means

A)   constrains restrictively.

B)   resolves neatly.

C)   obstructs completely.

D)   fastens securely.

Questions 33–42 are based on the following passage.

This passage is adapted from Jean-Jaques Rousseau, “Discourse on Inequality and Social Contract.” Originally published in 1762.

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33

This passage is primarily concerned with

A)   restoring the reputation of some widely maligned leaders of the past.

B)   comparing the merits of various ancient systems of government.

C)   examining the social conditions that foster effective legal systems.

D)   establishing the philosophical basis for universal democracy.

34

In line 2, the word “sounds” most nearly means

A)   resonates.

B)   enunciates.

C)   probes.

D)   appears.

35

In the first paragraph, the author discusses the activities of an architect in order to make the point that

A)   the success of a nation’s civil code depends on the nature of its people.

B)   good laws must be based on sound philosophical principles.

C)   nations that lack good laws cannot support a professional class.

D)   effective government requires experts to design civic infrastructure.

36

The author suggests that long-established societies are characterized primarily by

A)   stubborn resistance to political change.

B)   an honorable respect for good laws.

C)   periodic but predictable social renewal.

D)   a tendency toward imperialist expansion.

37

Which sentence provides the best evidence for the answer to the previous question?

A)   Lines 9–12 (“Also, good laws … vice”)

B)   Lines 19–21 (“Once customs … reformation”)

C)   Lines 30–34 (“Horror … vigor of youth”)

D)   Lines 71–73 (“The Tartars … as inevitable”)

38

In lines 17–18, the distinction between “peoples” and “men” is essentially one between

A)   barbarism and civilization.

B)   societies and individuals.

C)   youth and maturity.

D)   rebellion and obedience.

39

The author mentions “Sparta at the time of Lycurgus” (line 35) primarily as an example of a place where

A)   the citizens were paralyzed with fear in the face of invasion.

B)   the society was rejuvenated through conflict.

C)   the people lost sight of their own sacred traditions.

D)   the leaders had become foolish and cowardly.

40

In lines 37–38, the phrase “particular constitution of the state” refers most specifically to

A)   the documented rules by which a nation defines its governmental institutions.

B)   the social composition and cultural habits of a population.

C)   the enumeration of popular rights in a democratic society.

D)   a manifesto about the philosophical motivations for political change.

41

In lines 51–52, the phrase “amenable to discipline” most nearly means

A)   ready to be governed by the rule of law.

B)   susceptible to exploitation by neighboring countries.

C)   prepared to accept an oppressive ruler.

D)   trained for offensive or defensive military activity.

42

The author suggests that Peter the Great’s main flaw was

A)   military ruthlessness.

B)   undue reverence for custom.

C)   excessive political guile.

D)   irresolution in exerting control.

Questions 43–52 are based on the following passage.

This passage is adapted from Bertrand Russell, A History of Western Philosophy. ©1945 by Bertrand Russell, renewed by Edith Russell. Reprinted with permission of Simon & Schuster.

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43

The passage as a whole primarily serves to

A)   contrast the ideas of several ancient Greek philosophers.

B)   examine the means by which philosophical ideas become popular.

C)   describe the conceptions that inform a particular mindset.

D)   discuss the debt that modern physics owes to ancient thinkers.

44

The statement that “animals have lost their importance” (line 29) means that

A)   humans no longer treat other species with appropriate respect.

B)   animistic beliefs no longer inform our physical theories.

C)   scientists no longer regard animal behavior as a productive topic of study.

D)   humans do not use animals for transportation to the extent that they once did.

45

The “simpler system” in line 5 is a

A)   method for translating complex writings of ancient thinkers.

B)   streamlined system for reaching logically valid conclusions.

C)   formal theory based on a very small number of assumptions.

D)   relatively unrefined way of thinking.

46

Which of the following statements about ancient Greek philosophers is best supported by the passage?

A)   Their astronomical theories were closely associated with their religious ideas.

B)   Their ideas about mechanics inspired many important technological innovations.

C)   They regarded human intellect as a divine gift, rather than a cultivated skill.

D)   They valued imagination and creativity even more than reason and logic.

47

Which sentence provides the best evidence for the answer to the previous question?

A)   lines 61–65 (“It was natural … simplicity”)

B)   lines 45–47 (“To the Greek … of animals”)

C)   lines 40–45 (“To the modern … animals and machines”)

D)   lines 3–6 (“Every philosopher … quite unaware”)

48

In line 46, “assimilate” most nearly means

A)   incorporate.

B)   comprehend.

C)   embrace.

D)   liken.

49

The passage suggests that the “men of genius” (line 37) are noteworthy for their

A)   creative metaphors for the laws of motion.

B)   ability to integrate many different fields of study.

C)   effectiveness in articulating their ideas to others.

D)   willingness to disregard conventional wisdom.

50

Which of the following would best bridge the “gulf” in line 45?

A)   creating a system of gestures to help humans better communicate with dolphins

B)   writing a computer program that analyzes and categorizes mockingbird calls

C)   discovering the mechanical laws that describe bumblebee flight

D)   teaching modern students more about ancient Greek philosophy

51

The passage suggests that the “views of Aristotle” (line 1) are characterized primarily by their

A)   logical rigor.

B)   animistic tendencies.

C)   reliance on refutation.

D)   unwavering skepticism.

52

Which sentence provides the best evidence for the answer to the previous question?

A)   lines 3–6 (“Every philosopher … quite unaware”)

B)   lines 12–14 (“The sophistication … positive result”)

C)   lines 19–21 (“In relation … modern student”)

D)   lines 45–47 (“To the Greek … animals”)

STOP

If you finish before time is called, you may check your work on this section only. Do not turn to any other section of the test.