SAT 2016

CHAPTER 11

PRACTICE TEST 1

1.   Reading Test

65 MINUTES 52 QUESTIONS

2.   Writing and Language Test

35 MINUTES 44 QUESTIONS

3.   Math Test – No Calculator

25 MINUTES 20 QUESTIONS

4.   Math Test – Calculator

55 MINUTES 38 QUESTIONS

5.   Essay (optional)

50 MINUTES 1 QUESTION

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ANSWER SHEET

Start with number 1 for each new section. If a section has fewer questions than answer spaces, leave the extra answer spaces blank. Be sure to erase any errors or stray marks completely.

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Start with number 1 for each new section. If a section has fewer questions than answer spaces, leave the extra answer spaces blank. Be sure to erase any errors or stray marks completely.

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CAUTIONUse the answer spaces in the grids below for Section 3 only if you are told to do so in your test book.

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Start with number 1 for each new section. If a section has fewer questions than answer spaces, leave the extra answer spaces blank. Be sure to erase any errors or stray marks completely.

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CAUTION

Use the answer spaces in the grids below for Section 4 only if you are told to do so in your test book.

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SECTION 5: ESSAY

You may wish to remove these sample answer document pages to respond to the practice SAT Essay Test.

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SECTION 5: ESSAY

You may wish to remove these sample answer document pages to respond to the practice SAT Essay Test.

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SECTION 5: ESSAY

You may wish to remove these sample answer document pages to respond to the practice SAT Essay Test.

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SECTION 5: ESSAY

You may wish to remove these sample answer document pages to respond to the practice SAT Essay Test.

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Reading Test

65 MINUTES, 52 QUESTIONS

Turn to Section 1 of your answer sheet to answer the questions in this section.

DIRECTIONS

Each passage or pair of passages below is followed by a number of questions. After reading each passage or pair, choose the best answer to each question based on what is stated or implied in the passage or passages and in any accompanying graphics.

Questions 1–12 are based on the following passage.

Passage 1 is adapted from Nicholas Heidorn, “The Enduring Political Illusion of Farm Subsidies.” ©2004 The Independent Institute. Originally Published August 18, 2004 in the San Francisco Chronicle. Passage 2 is ©2015 by Mark Anestis. Since 1922, the U.S. government has subsidized the agricultural industry by supporting the price of crops (commodity subsidies), paying farmers let their fields go fallow (conservation subsidies), helping farmers purchase crop insurance (crop insurance subsidies), and compensating farmers for uninsured losses due to disasters (disaster subsidies). The following passages discuss these programs.

Passage 1

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Passage 2

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FEDERAL AGRICULTURAL SUBSIDIES IN THE UNITED STATES

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Source: From Environmental Working Group (farm.ewg.org)

1

Both passages acknowledge the effectiveness of U.S. farm subsidies in

A)   stabilizing commodity prices.

B)   expanding American exports.

C)   assisting smaller farms.

D)   increasing agricultural productivity.

2

The first sentence of Passage 1 refers primarily to the author’s belief that

A)   the American government is not doing enough to help small farmers.

B)   some American farmers are violating the law.

C)   a federal agricultural program is unfair and ineffective.

D)   American farmers are struggling to compete in international markets.

3

The author of Passage 2 would most likely regard the “taxes” mentioned in line 15 as

A)   a worthwhile expenditure.

B)   a misplaced priority.

C)   a political delusion.

D)   a technical misnomer.

4

The author of Passage 1 believes that the GAO report “probably won’t” (line 9) horrify lawmakers because

A)   the report indicates that farm subsidies are not as harmful as many suggest.

B)   most members of congress do not live in districts that receive farm subsidies.

C)   the legislature is too divided along ideological party lines.

D)   many members of congress receive benefits from pro-subsidy farm lobbies.

5

Which of the following provides the strongest evidence for the answer to the previous question?

A)   Lines 16–18 (“Because of … wheat prices”)

B)   Lines 21–24 (“To prevent this … prices again”)

C)   Lines 40–43 (“Indeed … family farms”)

D)   Lines 53–55 (“Agribusiness … sign of closing”)

6

Unlike Passage 1, Passage 2 emphasizes the danger of

A)   corrupt political officials.

B)   sudden changes in commodity prices.

C)   competition in international markets.

D)   onerous public tax burdens.

7

Passage 1 mentions the results of the 2009 poll (lines 40–43) primarily to

A)   confirm a general sentiment.

B)   refute a misconception.

C)   change the focus of the discussion.

D)   reveal a surprising finding.

8

If the author of Passage 1 were to use the data in the graph to support his main thesis, he would most likely mention

A)   the general decline in total farm subsidies from 2005 to 2012.

B)   the overall rate of change in commodity subsidies from 1998 to 2012.

C)   the expansion of crop insurance subsidies from the late 1990s to the late 2000s.

D)   the sudden spike in disaster subsidies from 2004 to 2005.

9

If the author of Passage 2 were to use the data in the graph to support his main thesis, he would most likely mention

A)   the general decline in total farm subsidies from 2005 to 2012.

B)   the overall rate of change in commodity subsidies from 1998 to 2012.

C)   the expansion of crop insurance subsidies from the late 1990s to the late 2000s.

D)   the sudden spike in disaster subsidies from 2004 to 2005.

10

The author of Passage 1 would most likely say that the “benefit” in line 85 is

A)   offset by its costs.

B)   an exception to a rule.

C)   enjoyed only by the wealthy.

D)   misrepresented by legislators.

11

Unlike Passage 2, Passage 1 makes a direct appeal to the reader’s

A)   sense of humor.

B)   distaste for ineptitude.

C)   environmental responsibility.

D)   fiscal prudence.

12

In line 55, the “floodgates” are controls against

A)   environmental destruction.

B)   unscrupulous funding.

C)   emotional outbursts.

D)   necessary capital.

Questions 13–22 are based on the following passage.

This passage is adapted from Marie Myung-Ok Lee, Somebody’s Daughter. ©2006 Beacon Press. The story is about a Korean-American girl adopted by an American family and raised in the Midwest.

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13

The narrator characterizes Reverend Jansen primarily as

A)   an aloof scholar.

B)   a fierce taskmaster.

C)   a sympathetic caregiver.

D)   a patronizing figure.

14

The narrator’s statement that her mother “had been murdered” (line 2) is best taken to mean that

A)   her mother was killed by a negligent driver.

B)   the reputation of her mother had been severely impugned.

C)   the death of her mother was deliberate.

D)   her adoptive family was trying to obliterate all memory of her biological mother.

15

The narrator’s description of the reverend’s “eyes” and “breath” in lines 15–16 primarily convey a sense of

A)   empathy.

B)   detachment.

C)   geniality.

D)   severity.

16

Christine believes that Sarah’s ethnicity is

A)   a source of pride.

B)   an exotic mystery.

C)   a sacred blessing.

D)   an unfortunate fact.

17

Which choice provides the best evidence for the answer to the previous question?

A)   Lines 13–16 (“God called … second”)

B)   Lines 24–26 (“That’s why … treasure”)

C)   Lines 48–52 (“It was almost … is not real”)

D)   Lines 76–80 (“Since the Korean … government coffers”)

18

Lines 26–28 (“God kills … my mother”) are striking for their use of

A)   juxtaposition.

B)   metaphor.

C)   personification.

D)   understatement.

19

Lines 36–49 chiefly describe Christine’s

A)   cunning deceitfulness.

B)   sense of superiority.

C)   motherly sympathy.

D)   emotional immaturity.

20

In line 45, “charged” most nearly means

A)   loaded.

B)   entrusted.

C)   attacked.

D)   demanded.

21

The passage suggests that Uncle Henry’s role in the Thorson family is that of

A)   a stern patriarch.

B)   a bigoted lout.

C)   a pitiable embarrassment.

D)   a noble hero.

22

The “cheery smirk” (line 81) is taken by the narrator to indicate Gumbel’s

A)   satisfaction with the publicity the Olympics were receiving.

B)   admiration for Korea’s economic competitiveness.

C)   pleasure that Korean children would be well cared for.

D)   happiness that Singapore had finally been defeated.

Questions 23–32 are based on the following passage and any accompanying material.

This passage is adapted from Christopher F. Black, “Baby Pictures of the Universe.” ©2015 by Christopher F. Black and College Hill Coaching.

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23

This passage is primarily concerned with

A)   chronicling the discoveries yielded by recent satellite telescopes.

B)   examining the controversies surrounding a physical theory.

C)   discussing the analysis and significance of a cosmological phenomenon.

D)   describing similarities between the study of human history and the study of astronomy.

24

The author presents the “Gettysburg Cyclorama” (line 1) primarily as

A)   an illustrative analogy.

B)   a historical precedent.

C)   a quaint anachronism.

D)   an accidental success.

25

Lines 11–13 (“Unfortunately … human eyes”) convey the author’s disappointment in

A)   the appropriateness of a comparison.

B)   an audience’s level of interest.

C)   the magnitude of an event.

D)   the accessibility of a phenomenon.

26

The quotation marks around the words “invisible” (line 26) and “see” (line 28) serve primarily to

A)   draw attention to two relatively recent coinages.

B)   imply that the author is speaking speculatively.

C)   suggest an irony implicit in conventional terms.

D)   indicate a technical usage of common words.

27

The “moment a swaddled one-day-old opens its eyes” (lines 22–23) corresponds to the instant that

A)   scientists first discovered the cosmic microwave background radiation.

B)   all of the particles and energy in the universe were created in the Big Bang.

C)   the cosmic microwave background radiation was first released from the hydrogen plasma.

D)   George Gamow first published his theory about the cosmic microwave background radiation.

28

In line 64, “distinctive” most nearly means

A)   bizarre.

B)   distinguishing.

C)   elite.

D)   irreconcilable.

29

Which of the following can be inferred about the work that earned Penzias and Wilson the Nobel Prize?

A)   It was the product of decades of research.

B)   It was the result of an accidental discovery.

C)   It depended greatly on the data from the COBE satellite.

D)   It provided a more plausible alternative to Gamow’s theory.

30

Which choice provides the best evidence for the answer to the previous question?

A)   Lines 60–63 (“His theory … current data”)

B)   Lines 72–75 (“Their initial … droppings”)

C)   Lines 82–89 (“Since then … Gamow’s guess”)

D)   Lines 89–96 (“In addition … early universe”)

31

Figure 1 best confirms which claim made in the passage?

COSMIC BACKGROUND RADIATION SPECTRUM FROM COBE
AND BLACKBODY RADIATION CURVES FOR VARIOUS TEMPERATURES

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Figure 1.   Comparison of COBE radiation data to blackbody curves for 2° K and 3° K

A)   “For the first 380,000 years of its life … the universe was ‘invisible’” (lines 24–26)

B)   “the CMB radiation did not originate from just one point in space” (lines 53–54)

C)   “the expanding universe would have cooled this radiation to below 5 degrees Kelvin today” (lines 66–67)

D)   “CMB radiation … has a nearly perfect blackbody spectrum” (lines 85–87)

32

Figure 2 best confirms which claim made in the passage?

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Figure 2.   Panoramic map of the cosmic background radiation showing temperatures ranging from 2.7248° K (dark) to 2.7252° K (white)

A)   “For the first 380,000 years of its life … the universe was ‘invisible’” (lines 24–26)

B)   “the CMB radiation did not originate from just one point in space” (lines 53–54)

C)   “the expanding universe would have cooled this radiation to about 5 degrees Kelvin” (lines 66–67)

D)   “CMB radiation … has a nearly perfect blackbody spectrum” (lines 85–87)

Questions 33–42 are based on the following passage.

This passage is from John Adams, “A Dissertation on Canon and Feudal law.” Originally published in 1765.

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1 benefit

2 related to church matters

33

The first paragraph is primarily concerned with the right of citizens to

A)   pursue academic interests.

B)   learn more about their leaders.

C)   become proficient in the art of printing.

D)   propose helpful legislation.

34

In line 14, “constitute” most nearly means

A)   place in power.

B)   account for.

C)   amount to.

D)   be regarded as.

35

The passage indicates that our “forefathers” (line 49) endured all of the following EXCEPT

A)   physical deprivation.

B)   political oppression.

C)   arduous physical labor.

D)   a sense of despair.

36

The passage indicates that all people are born with

A)   a curious nature.

B)   a desire for power.

C)   a dread of tyranny.

D)   a sense of thrift.

37

Which sentence provides the best evidence for the answer to the previous question?

A)   Lines 1–5 (“Liberty … to know”)

B)   Lines 10–15 (“And if the cause … trustees”)

C)   Lines 20–25 (“The only question … public expenses”)

D)   Lines 38–46 (“Let us study … earth and hell”)

38

In line 34, the phrase “every order and degree” refers to

A)   an anthology of official declarations.

B)   a set of civic responsibilities.

C)   the diverse groups within a society.

D)   the highest standards of academic achievement.

39

Compared to the first paragraph, the second paragraph is more

A)   prescriptive.

B)   despondent.

C)   critical.

D)   ironic.

40

In line 51, “power” refers to

A)   a personal ability.

B)   a social virtue.

C)   a despotic agent.

D)   a mysterious spirit.

41

In line 46, “the gates of earth and hell” refer primarily to

A)   the privations endured by our forefathers.

B)   the superstitions of ancient cultures.

C)   the dangers posed by an ignorant populace.

D)   the brutality of oppressive leaders.

42

In the second paragraph, the discussion of the “views and ends” (line 48) of our forefathers primarily serves to

A)   remind the reader of the importance of liberty.

B)   establish a contrast between the past and the present.

C)   emphasize the significance of hard work.

D)   draw attention to an unfortunate tradition.

Questions 43–52 are based on the following passage and supplementary material.

This passage is from David Biello, “Can Tiny Plankton Help Reverse Climate Change?” ©2015 by David Biello. Originally published in Aeon (http://aeon.co/) on July 1, 2014.

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Source: Image from Jan Lieser and NASA Terra Modis

NASA satellite image of the largest recorded natural phytoplankton bloom in February 2012, believed to have been caused by the addition of iron dust blown into the sea around Antarctica by strong offshore winds.

43

The characterization of the Southern Ocean in the first paragraph (lines 1–8) primarily serves to emphasize

A)   the improbability of Smetacek’s success.

B)   the pessimism of Smetacek’s detractors.

C)   the boldness of Smetacek’s experiment.

D)   the promise of Smetacek’s hypothesis.

44

In line 13, the word “base” most nearly means

A)   sordid.

B)   precarious.

C)   stark.

D)   foundational.

45

The passage indicates that the “fertilizer run-off” (line 23) is

A)   an unfortunate by-product.

B)   an environmental hazard.

C)   a potential sustenance.

D)   a source of oxygen.

46

The author regards the fertilization of oceans with iron as

A)   a well-intentioned but environmentally dangerous activity.

B)   a brave but needlessly expensive endeavor.

C)   a promising and feasible solution to a global problem.

D)   an established and valuable component of the worldwide economy.

47

Which sentence provides the best evidence for the answer to the previous question?

A)   Lines 5–6 (“Its churning … ships”)

B)   Lines 75–84 (“Activists stoked … crabs and worms”)

C)   Lines 90–92 (“Replenishing … the practice”)

D)   Lines 94–96 (“Instead, it’s … environment”)

48

Which of the following statements about Smetacek’s research is best supported by Figure 1?

A)   The iron fertilization from Smetacek’s experiment created a secondary algal bloom nearly as large as the primary bloom.

B)   Smetacek’s experiment would likely have been more successful if it were conducted in February, which is the warmest month in the southern hemisphere.

C)   Naturally occurring algal blooms in the Southern Ocean can be more than 30 times as large as the one created in Smetacek’s experiments.

D)   Algal blooms are likely to get smaller as they move away from the ice shelves that surround Antarctica.

49

The passage suggests that Smetacek regarded the death of the alga bloom described in lines 61–65 as

A)   vindication of his theory that iron fertilization can lead to carbon sequestration.

B)   an indication of the potential dangers of “dead zones” such as those in the Gulf of Mexico.

C)   evidence that there was insufficient oxygen in the Southern Ocean to support large blooms.

D)   a disappointment because the diatoms were being removed from the food chain.

50

The passage suggests that iron fertilization could potentially help the whale population primarily by

A)   increasing the concentration of oxygen in the ecosphere.

B)   decreasing the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

C)   supporting an important food source for the whales.

D)   reducing the demand for hunting in areas where the whales are endangered.

51

The “route” mentioned in line 91 refers to

A)   an experimental procedure.

B)   an economic difficulty.

C)   an idealistic approach.

D)   a mode of persuasion.

52

The tone of the final paragraph is best described as

A)   sanguine.

B)   awestruck.

C)   apprehensive.

D)   fatalistic.

STOP

If you finish before time is called, you may check your work on this section only. Do not turn to any other section of the test.