How to Prepare for Verbal Ability and Reading Comprehension for the CAT (2014)

Part 2: Verbal Ability

Section 4: Paragraph Jumbles

Block 2: LODs and CAT Questions

Chapter 16. Level of Difficulty—I

1.

(A)

God has managed the amazing feat of being worshipped and invisible at the same time.

 

(B)

Millions of people might describe him as a white bearded father figure sitting on a throne in the sky, but none could claim to be an eyewitness.

 

(C)

Although it doesn’t seem possible to offer a single fact about the Almighty that would hold up in a court of law, somehow the vast majority of people believe in God—as many as 96 percent, according to some polls.

 

(D)

This reveals a huge gap between belief and what we call everyday reality.

 

(E)

We need to heal this gap.

   

(a) ABCDE

(b) BCDEA

   

(c) ABDEC

(d) CABDE

   

(e) BADCE

 

2.

(A)

This result was all the more astonishing when it was discovered that the person doing the praying didn’t have to know the patient personally, or even know their names.

 

(B)

Seriously ill patients in hospitals were divided into groups, some being prayed for, while others were not.

 

(C)

A striking example that there is a reachable place beyond material reality, and that is prayer.

 

(D)

In all cases, best medical care was still given, yet it became evident that the prayed-for group seemed to recover better.

 

(E)

Beginning more than twenty years ago, researchers devised experiments to try to verify whether prayer had any efficacy.

   

(a) ECBAD

(b) CEBDA

   

(c) EADCB

(d) CBEDA

   

(e) ABCDE

 

3.

(A)

A snail’s neurons pick up signals from the outside worlds so slowly, for example, that events any faster than three seconds would not be perceived.

 

(B)

In other words, if a snail was looking at an apple, and I quickly reached in and snatched it away, the snail would not be able to detect my hand.

 

(C)

It would “see” the apple disappear before its very eyes.

 

(D)

In the animal kingdom some nervous systems are much faster than ours and others much slower.

 

(E)

In the same way, quantum flashes are millions of time too rapid for us to register, so our brains play a trick on us by “seeing” solid objects that are continuous in time and space, the same way that a movie seems continuous.

   

(a) DABCE

(b) DEABC

   

(c) DACBE

(d) EDABC

   

(e) ACBDE

 

4.

(A)

A person is neither the product of just her environment nor just her genetic make up.

 

(B)

Let me give an example.

 

(C)

A child is born with a talent for music, which then gets nurtured through continuous training in a conducive atmosphere.

 

(D)

The transactional model of child development helps to resolve the split between nature and nurture.

 

(E)

Rather it is the complex interaction between the two that is key.

   

(a) BCDAE

(b) DAEBC

   

(c) ADBCE

(d) ADEBC

   

(e) EABCD

5.

(A)

At first, you think of it as just a matter of growing bigger.

 

(B)

There is nothing in the world more fascinating than watching a child grow and develop.

 

(C)

Then, as the infant begins to do things, you may think of it as “learning tricks”.

 

(D)

In some ways, the development of each child retraces the whole history of the human race, physically and spiritually, step by step.

 

(E)

But, it’s really more complicated and full of meaning than that.

   

(a) BACED

(b) DABCE

   

(c) ACBDE

(d) DACBE

   

(e) ABCDE

6.

(A)

On the one hand, we can trivialize the word by applying it to virtually any human activity.

 

(B)

On the other hand, we can ignore or reject the significance of the original meaning of the term and replace it with a technical definition, such as “conceptual analysis” or “the methodology of science”.

 

(C)

Like all expressions, however it is subject to two kinds of distortion.

 

(D)

The word ‘philosophy’ is of Greek origin and means literally, “love of or friendship for wisdom.”

 

(E)

This simple linguistic fact shows us at once that philosophy is an intrinsic expression of human nature.

   

(a) CABDE

(b) ABCDE

   

(c) DCABE

(d) DECAB

   

(e) ACBDE

7.

(A)

Some books, nevertheless, offer “inside stuff” or “tricks” which they claim will enable you to beat the test.

 

(B)

This is not to say that the CAT is “beatable”.

 

(C)

Although the CAT is a difficult test, it is a very learnable test.

 

(D)

You probably have already realized this.

 

(E)

There is no bag of tricks that will show you how to master it overnight.

   

(a) ABCDE

(b) CBEDA

   

(c) CABED

(d) BACED

   

(e) ADBCE

8.

(A)

Its aim was to remove from dance, any external associations, so that the dancers could concentrate on pure movement and pure pattern.

 

(B)

Abstract dance was the name of a specific style of ballet, devised in the 1920s and developed at the bahaus.

 

(C)

Ballroom dancing, for example, is concerned with the pleasure the movement and pattern-making give to the dancers, and not with some external ‘programme’.

 

(D)

In the wider sense, a great deal of dance is ‘abstract’.

   

(a) DBAC

(b) BADC

   

(c) BDCA

(d) BDAC

   

(e) ABCD

9.

(A)

In those countries where the ideals of liberty and equality have received the greatest devotion, and particularly in America, the political constitution has been framed with the precise object of making impossible too great a concentration of power.

 

(B)

A philosophy that emphasizes the likeness of all men will be averse from recognizing those exceptional qualities in any individual which place him so clearly above his fellows that he may justly claim to lead and influence them.

 

(C)

A different though related strand of thought is equalitarian.

 

(D)

Further, when circumstances make it necessary for a particular individual to display qualities of leadership in a very high degree, his position is under constant and bitter attack on the score of dictatorship, and it is necessary for him to conceal his qualities, consciously, behind a façade of ‘ordinariness’.

   

(a) CBAD

(b) CABD

   

(c) CDAB

(d) DCAB

   

(e) DCBA

10.

(A)

It has removed many of the material obstacles to the pursuit of the good life from the majority of mankind in those countries at a high level of technical development.

 

(B)

But it has exposed us to new dangers, not the obvious dangers of new weapons of destruction, but the much more serious ones of a purely materialist view of life.

 

(C)

The growth of science and technology has conferred obvious and immense benefits upon the community.

 

(D)

It has also, as we too often forget, made possible new and daring adventures of the mind

   

(a) CADB

(b) ABDC

   

(c) ACBD

(d) CDBA

   

(e) ABCD

11.

(A)

There are manifest dangers in the persuasive aspect of leadership.

 

(B)

It is alarming, for example, to reflect how great a part the power to speak well has acquired in an age of broadcasting.

 

(C)

It is quite possible for men to feel that they are freely giving their allegiance to a leader, when actually they are simply slaves of his techniques of propaganda.

 

(D)

At its lowest, the technique of persuasion may involve all those devices of suggestion and propaganda which are so freely available to the unscrupulous in a scientific age.

   

(a) ABDC

(b) ACBD

   

(c) CDBA

(d) ADBC

   

(e) DABC

   

12.

(A)

The leader should possess high intelligence.

 

(B)

The reasons for this frequent neglect of intelligence as a prerequisite of leadership are complex.

 

(C)

It is certainly true to say that this is more commonly underrated than any other aspect of leadership.

 

(D)

There is first, a very general misunderstanding of such a phrase as ‘of very high intelligence.’

   

(a) ABCD

(b) ACBD

   

(c) DABC

(d) DBAC

   

(e) CABD

   

13.

(A)

As with everybody else, the guard was ordered to go through the metal detector.

 

(B)

Before doing so, he handed his M-16 rifle to security personnel, along with other items such as handcuffs and a torch.

 

(C)

The guard shift was rotating, and a guard in full uniform, was in line in front of him.

 

(D)

When returning from a business trip, my father approached a security checkpoint at the airport.

 

(E)

When the guard went through the machine, an alarm went off and he was inspected with a hand-held wand which detected a Swiss army knife inside one of his pockets.

   

(a) DCABE

(b) DBCAE

   

(c) DCAEB

(d) BCAED

   

(e) ABCDE

   

14.

(A)

He required, for instance, that all cars be parked ‘about a meter’ away from the others cars.

 

(B)

I had a very organized commanding officer when I was in the army.

 

(C)

Once he called me over and pointed out a car that was parked less than ‘about a meter’ away from the other cars.

 

(D)

I told him that the vehicle in question was owned by Captain Jorge, well known for his ill temper and feared by those above and below him in rank.

 

(E)

The commander thought for a few minutes and ordered: “Tell everyone to align their cars according to Captain Jorge’s”.

   

(a) ABDCE

(b) BACDE

   

(c) DCABE

(d) EBADC

   

(e) ABCDE

   

15.

(A)

She had made her last trip to Canada.

 

(B)

Five years later, she surprised me when she phoned to say she had booked a flight and was coming to visit.

 

(C)

My mother, who lives in Germany, visited my family in Canada every year.

 

(D)

But at age 80, she informed us that the 16 hours of travelling was too much for her.

 

(E)

I asked her what, at age 85, had made her change her mind

   

(a) CDBAE

(b) CDABE

   

(c) CEDAB

(d) ABECD

   

(e) DACBE

   

16.

(A)

On one of our walks, three lads cycled past.

 

(B)

I am short and stocky with grey hair and beard

 

(C)

My dog was also short and stocky and had grey hair.

 

(D)

I heard one of them say, “That’s a strange one.”

 

(E)

The second boy agreed, exclaiming, “Yes—It’s all grey and fluffy.”

   

(a) ADCEB

(b) CADEB

   

(c) BCADE

(d) DCABE

   

(e) BCDAE

   

17.

(A)

Easy or not, etiquette is important.

 

(B)

There’s a reason for doing things the way we do them—we just have no idea what it is.

 

(C)

I had to interrupt my cell phone call to tell him off.

 

(D)

I was trying to explain this the other night to my children—Matt, 15, and Becky, 11—who, I’m ashamed to say, have been allowed to develop less-than perfect manners, especially at the table.

 

(E)

At this particular family dinner, I caught Matt buttering his baked potato with his finger.

   

(a) ABCDE

(b) ABDEC

   

(c) BCDAE

(d) BDACE

   

(e) ABECD

   

18.

(A)

Not a plastic tray or all-you-can-eat dessert bar in sight.

 

(B)

Becky, whose idea of great dining is to graze the free sample aisle at cafes, immediately had questions.

 

(C)

The Restaurant was amazing.

 

(D)

A distinguished-looking waiter with an elegant accent presented our menus.

 

(E)

“How can they charge this much for food?”

   

(a) CDABE

(b) ADCBE

   

(c) EDBCA

(d) CADEB

   

(e) ABCDE

   

19.

(A)

A trainee was standing guard inside a room when he heard a pounding on the door and the order “Let men in!”

 

(B)

Through the window, he saw the uniform of an officer and immediately opened the door.

 

(C)

He quickly realized his mistake when the officer yelled,” Airman! Why didn’t you check for my authority to enter?”

 

(D)

Guards in air force basic training must check all IDs.

 

(E)

Thinking fast, the airman replied, “Sir, you’d have got in anyway.”

   

(a) DABCE

(b) DBACE

   

(c) DBECA

(d) DAEBC

   

(e) DCABE

   

20.

(A)

Peggy Conlon was 15 when her mum, dad and 14 siblings moved to a big house in Adelanto, a tiny town in California’s high southern desert.

 

(B)

School lunches were packed assembly-line style; baths taken in shifts in the bathroom—younger kids before bed, older kids in the morning.

 

(C)

Life was all about directing traffic and as the oldest child, Peggy was the chief traffic monitor.

 

(D)

In addition to the Conlon brood, there were cats, dogs, chickens, rabbits and a pony.

 

(E)

Dinner was set on a 3.5 metre long dining table her father had made from a church door.

   

(a) ADEBC

(b) AEBCD

   

(c) ABECD

(d) CABDE

   

(e) ABCDE

   

21.

(A)

There in the soap-scented air and the glare of neon, they sorted, washed, dried, and folded up to 20 loads of clothes.

 

(B)

That’s when Mary would talk to her daughter about helping others and her dreams for the future.

 

(C)

Every Friday night, from the time she was eight, Peggy and her mother, Mary, loaded the family station wagon with dirty clothes and drove to a Laundromat.

 

(D)

When they were finally done at about l am, they’d head to an all night coffee shop for hot fudge sundaes and a rare quiet time together.

 

(E)

Diapers were always a big item.

   

(a) CADEB

(b) CBDAE

   

(c) CAEDB

(d) BCADE

   

(e) BACDE

   

22.

(A)

I lived with my grandparents until I left home at 16.

 

(B)

She worked and did very well, but she still needed the support her parents provided, and we lived with them in New York for many years.

 

(C)

So all three of them, my mum, Ondrea Smith, and my grandparents Eugene and Ellen Griffith—raised me.

 

(D)

Don’t get me wrong; my mum was around too,

 

(E)

But she was a single parent and had me when she was just 21.

   

(a) AEDCB

(b) ADEBC

   

(c) CADEB

(d) ACDED

   

(e) ABCDE

   

23.

(A)

He had been a paramedic in the army in World War II, and when I lived with him, he worked for the post office.

 

(B)

He was from a west Indian family, and people from the west Indies are known for their frugality—like the work 300 jobs and spend no money.

 

(C)

I’d see him leave every morning, go to work and come home at night.

 

(D)

Then he’d do things like fix his own car. And instead of relaxing, he’d be out patrolling the neighborhood, making sure it was safe for his family.

 

(E)

My grandfather looked like a big Buddha, and his overall vibe was jolly, like Santa.

   

(a) EBCAD

(b) ECBAD

   

(c) EBACD

(d) CDABE

   

(e) EABCD

   

24.

(A)

When I say tough, I mean she was the kind of person that didn’t want to be kissed or hugged, but she would show you all the love in the world.

 

(B)

My grandmother—she was generous, but she was tough.

 

(C)

They let the employees have certain stuff, damaged goods.

 

(D)

She used to bring little race cars and other toys home to me every day.

 

(E)

Talk about a kid being blessed, and God has been looking out for me from the beginning: My grand mother worked in a toy factory!

   

(a) EDCAB

(b) BAECD

   

(c) BCAED

(d) EDABC

   

(e) BDAEC

   

25.

(A)

The man shook his head and pointed to a stage close to my wife, where the pianist was sitting at a grand piano, cheerfully playing away.

 

(B)

As the negotiations were completely new to her, she had to focus her full attention on the discussion.

 

(C)

She was invited by some customers to discuss business in a well-known tavern.

 

(D)

The background music bothered her greatly, so when the waiter was passing her table, she asked if he could turn the music down.

 

(E)

My wife had just been appointed bank manager of a local branch.

   

(a) ECBDA

(b) EBCDA

   

(c) BCDAE

(d) BCDEA

   

(e) DAEBC

   

26.

(A)

He insisted we check again, and again the deckhand found nothing out of order.

 

(B)

When the man called a third time, I sent the deckhand directly to his cabin.

 

(C)

I sent a deckhand to check the lifeboat and called the guest back to say nothing had been found.

 

(D)

During my work, handling the front desk of a cruise ship, a passenger called to say he’d spotted a stowaway in a lifeboat when he’d glanced out of his cabin window.

 

(E)

The deckhand soon called to assure me there was no need for alarm: The guest had been reporting on his own reflection in the window.

   

(a) EBACD

(b) DCBAE

   

(c) DCABE

(d) DBACE

   

(e) EABCD

   

27.

(A)

Their son, Matthew, a Navy meteorologist, was assigned there.

 

(B)

Michael Flocco veered into the driveway of his home and dashed from his truck.

 

(C)

The stocky sheet-metal worker had rushed back from a construction site nearby to join his wife, Sheila, after learning of the terrorist attack on the Pentagon.

 

(D)

Michael found Sheila sitting on the couch sobbing.

 

(E)

It was almost 10:30 am on Tuesday, September 11, 2001.

   

(a) BECAD

(b) BDECA

   

(c) BEDCA

(d) DACEB

   

(e) BAECD

   

28.

(A)

Handsome in his tuxedo.

 

(B)

Lanky at his high school prom.

 

(C)

Matthew with the striped kitten—had he been five?

 

(D)

At ten—smiling in his yellow soccer jersey.

 

(E)

Throughout the TV replays of the collapsing Trade Towers, Michael’s glance shifted from one framed photo to the next.

   

(a) ECDBA

(b) ABCDE

   

(c) ECBDA

(d) DABCE

   

(e) DAEBC

   

29.

(A)

Matthew was always the kid with his head in the clouds, the stars, the sky.

 

(B)

With high marks, and great moves on the sports field, his dream had been an athletic scholarship, but an injured elbow and a bad rotator cuff got in the way.

 

(C)

So Matthew enlisted in the Navy.

 

(D)

By fourth standard, Matthew was bored with cartoons on TV, and his dad often returned from work to find him lying on the floor, absorbed in the blue and red curves of the cold fronts and low-pressure systems swirling across the weather channel maps.

 

(E)

He hoped to go to college, even though the family’s savings would not stretch far.

   

(a) DABEC

(b) DACEB

   

(c) ADEBC

(d) DAEBC

   

(e) EABDC

   

30.

(A)

The couple have diametrically opposite approaches to investing.

 

(B)

Lynn, 58, is a believer in mutual funds and has “a bit of a gambler’s streak” that’s made her a successful investor.

 

(C)

That could have been the case for Lynn and George Wick.

 

(D)

According to financial planner Michael Banwell, antagonism can arise when couples have different investing styles, especially when there are concerns there won’t be enough money to retire with.

 

(E)

George, 12 years her senior, has always put cash into FDs and left it there.

   

(a) DACBE

(b) DCABE

   

(c) EBADC

(d) ECABD

   

(e) ABCDE

   

31.

(A)

With her friends crowded round, she opened a package to find …a dictionary and a thesaurus.

 

(B)

“She was forever looking for a dictionary and didn’t have one,” he says, “but it was obvious I didn’t get it right.”

 

(C)

On her 25th birthday, Maria Nicozzi got a gift from her boy friend, Thomas that she’ll never forget.

 

(D)

For his part, Thomas, who went on to become Maria’s husband despite the gift, had carefully considered what to get her.

 

(E)

“I felt it should have been something more substantial and romantic.” She says.

   

(a) CDBEA

(b) CAEDB

   

(c) CBAED

(d) CEABD

   

(e) DCABE

   

32.

(A)

Once it was installed, however, I realized that the new chair’s enormous flowers, so playful in the furniture store, overwhelmed the muted stripes of our downstairs wallpaper.

 

(B)

“It’s a little loud, Isn’t it?” my husband asked cautiously.

 

(C)

While I was expecting our fifth child, I chose a chair at a discount furniture store to replace a dog-eared, stuffing-spitting relic.

 

(D)

In fact, the sight of the chair in the living room made my teeth hurt.

 

(E)

“It’s shouting,” I agreed glumly.

   

(a) ABECD

(b) BAECD

   

(c) CABED

(d) CBAED

   

(e) ABCDE

   

33.

(A)

You can’t change public perception by force.

 

(B)

So we start making films where violence is not the only solution, like Hero and the next film I plan to make.

 

(C)

When you get older, you start to think, What can we give to the younger audience.

 

(D)

But we are so used to watching heroes use violence to stop violence.

 

(E)

When I was young, I didn’t know if the violence was bad or good, so I just did the action —— good guy kills bad guy.

   

(a) ECBDA

(b) BDAEC

   

(c) ECDBA

(d) EDCBA

   

(e) EABCD

   

34.

(A)

I really did quit once when I was nine years old

 

(B)

My coach came to my home every week and just cut my hair, brought a book or food and didn’t talk about training.

 

(C)

He tried to make me feel guilty.

 

(D)

Children think of quitting many times.

 

(E)

My foot was broken, and I trained for three days before I decided I didn’t want to.

   

(a) DABCE

(b) DBACE

   

(c) DAEBC

(d) AEBCD

   

(e) BACDE

   

35.

(A)

In obstructive sleep apnea, tissue in the throat relaxes during sleep, collapsing—and closing off—the airway.

 

(B)

Worse, he routinely stopped breathing. Tests at a sleep clinic yielded a quick diagnosis: sleep apnea.

 

(C)

Then his weight ballooned and his blood pressure soared.

 

(D)

Along with the weight gain, Currie, a 55-year-old radio announcer, developed a snoring problem, his wife informed him.

 

(E)

Roger Currie quit smoking ten years ago.

   

(a) EDCBA

(b) ECBDA

   

(c) ECDBA

(d) EABDC

   

(e) EBCDA

   

36.

(A)

The result: an epidemic of fatigue that’s ratcheting up stress at work and road rage among motorists, and is literally aging us before our time.

 

(B)

Some of us may need the attention of professionals; others have to make more time for sleep in their schedules.

 

(C)

People are sleeping less today and snoring more, tossing and turning and eyeing the clock, praying for dawn.

 

(D)

Either way, quality sleep should be a priority.

 

(E)

It’s a shame, since scientists have made great strides in treating almost every type of sleep disorder often without medication and with great rates of success.

   

(a) EBDCA

(b) EBDAC

   

(c) CAEBD

(d) CADEB

   

(e) ACBED

   

37.

(A)

Van Cauter then tested the volunteers on insulin resistance, a measure of how well the body processes blood sugar.

 

(B)

Van Cauter recently monitored 27 sleepers between the ages of 23 and 42 in their homes.

 

(C)

One group slept just over five hours on weeknights; the other eight.

 

(D)

The greater one’s resistance, the greatest his risk of diabetes.

 

(E)

The results were astonishing. The shorter sleepers had 50 per cent more insulin resistance than the longer sleepers.

   

(a) BACDE

(b) BCADE

   

(c) CADBE

(d) CADEB

   

(e) BDACE

   

38.

(A)

“Mum’s been murdered,” his brother said in a shaky voice.

 

(B)

It was a burglary gone awry.

 

(C)

On New Year’s Day, 1996, psychologist Everett Worthington’s phone rang.

 

(D)

Two youths had broken in, and she had surprised them.

 

(E)

She was killed with a crowbar.

   

(a) CABDE

(b) CDBAE

   

(c) ABDEC

(d) CDBEA

   

(e) ABCDE

   

39.

(A)

The role of Western values in contemporary Indian society is a subject on which I have pondered for years.

 

(B)

Moreover, various stakeholders of our company—employees, investors, customers and vendors—come from across the globe.

 

(C)

An organization is representative of society, and some of the lessons that I have learnt from the West regarding values are, I think, applicable to us as a nation.

 

(D)

I come from a company that is built on strong values.

 

(E)

In dealing with them over the years, I have come to appreciate several aspects of the West’s value system.

   

(a) ABDEC

(b) ADBEC

   

(c) DBECA

(d) DBCAE

   

(e) ABCDE

   

40.

(A)

Indian culture has deep-rooted family values.

 

(B)

Unfortunately, our attitude towards the community is very different from our attitude towards the family.

 

(C)

Although we keep our homes spotlessly clean, when we go out we do not think twice before littering.

 

(D)

Parents make enormous sacrifices for their children; children consider it their duty to take care of aged parents.

 

(E)

And marriage is held to be a sacred union with husband and wife bonded for life.

   

(a) AEBCD

(b) ACBED

   

(c) DEBCA

(d) ADEBC

   

(e) DABCE

   

41.

(A)

“To play great music,” he said, “you must keep your eyes on a distant star.”

 

(B)

Eleven years old, I was taking a violin lesson with Georges Enesco, my teacher, in his Paris studio.

 

(C)

At the time, I took this to mean, simply, “Give your very best to every piece.”

 

(D)

A deep-chested, powerful man with a rugged, gentle face, Enesco looked at me across the violin he held under his chin, and shook his bow.

   

(a) BACD

(b) BDAC

   

(c) DACB

(d) DACB

   

(e) ACBD

   

42.

(A)

I felt the truth of it when I visited Rock-feller Institute.

 

(B)

They were as dedicated as monks in a 14th century monastery, yet their lives were being fulfilled because their eyes were on the star.

 

(C)

Here a scientist worked with quite absorption developing antibiotics; there, another investigated a possible cure for tuberculosis; a third studied the effects of too much sugar in the blood.

 

(D)

You don’t have to be a musician to benefit from my teacher’s wisdom.

   

(a) CBAD

(b) ACDB

   

(c) DACB

(d) DABC

   

(e) ABCD

   

43.

(A)

They learned that if they brought the kid in, they could get another $5.

 

(B)

The first time I went onstage with my father, I was five years old, and we were at a hotel in New York.

 

(C)

My mother was being paid $5 as his pianist, and he got $15 to perform comedy and sing.

 

(D)

I sang, “Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?”

   

(a) DCBA

(b) ADBC

   

(c) BCAD

(d) BADC

   

(e) DABC

   

44.

(A)

I did everything—conducting the orchestra, monologue, mime, audience participation, playing instruments, dancing, singing, production numbers, incredible bits and pieces and wild physicality.

 

(B)

My mum and dad came back to the dressing room, and I said, “How was it, Dad?”

 

(C)

Whew! I did a show in Vegas years later, in 1980, the best two hours and 20 minutes I ever had onstage.

 

(E)

He said, “It wasn’t bad for an amateur.”

   

(a) DBAC

(b) BCDA

   

(c) CABD

(d) BDCA

   

(e) BADC

   

45.

(A)

When a man is his son’s hero, it’s about the best thing that God gave us on this planet.

 

(B)

I can see it now with my son Anthony, who’s been traveling with me and documenting my work.

 

(C)

I was doing a lecture recently.

 

(D)

And he was out in the audience with a camera, and I caught his face, that twinkles for a second, where his eyes said to me, that’s my dad.

   

(a) ABCD

(b) ACBD

   

(c) BACD

(d) CBAD

   

(e) DABC

   

46.

(A)

On the one hand, I want very much for someone else to clean our house, as neither I nor my husband, Ed, has shown any aptitude for it.

 

(B)

No one but me, for instance, should have to clean up the dental floss heaped like spaghetti near the wastebasket where I toss it each night, never catching on that floss is not something that can be thrown with a high degree of accuracy.

 

(C)

On the other hand, I’d feel guilt inflicting such distasteful drudgery on another human being.

 

(D)

Have always wanted and not wanted a cleaning person.

   

(a) DACB

(b) CBAD

   

(c) CABD

(d) ABDC

   

(e) BADC

   

47.

(A)

“Are you all right?” I asked, as I helped her to her seat. “That turbulence was as bad as it gets.”

 

(B)

Flying in the summer in the US means one thing: turbulence.

 

(C)

I was working as a flight attendant when we hit a patch of very rough air just after a young teenager, obviously on her first flight, had entered the bathroom.

 

(D)

After the bumps had subsided, she exited the bathroom, a look of sheer terror etched on her face.

 

(E)

“So that’s what it was,” she said, “I thought I’d pushed the wrong button.”

   

(a) DAEBC

(b) BCDAE

   

(c) AEBDC

(d) CADBE

   

(e) ABCDE

   

48.

(A)

And when it happens on rare occasions that we “cheat” death, we believe just for a moment, in immorality.

 

(B)

Today scientists are tempting fate in ways never before imagined, as they demystify the secrets of longevity.

 

(C)

We human beings are the only animals capable of contemplating our own demise.

 

(D)

We mourn, we memorialize, we philosophize and we pray.

   

(a) DACB

(b) DCBA

   

(c) CDAB

(d) ABCD

   

(e) ABCD

   

49.

(A)

An expert in the genetics of aging, she believes that altering genes to extend life span may not be far off.

 

(B)

Campisi is a senior molecular biologist at one of America’s top research centers.

 

(C)

Piles of papers rise from the floor like unsteady chimneys, some nearly as tall as four-foot ten scientists.

 

(D)

In her basement office, Judith Campisi sits on the edge of a chair and speaks with wide-eyed enthusiasm, usually reserved for first-year graduate students.

   

(a) DCBA

(b) DBCA

   

(c) BCAD

(d) BDAC

   

(e) ABCD

   

50.

(A)

Paying the cable bill had been on my to-do list, but somehow it hadn’t been paid in well, let’s just say a number of months.

 

(B)

As I handed over the cheque, I mumbled my apologies and berated myself for my oversight.

 

(C)

I was packing the paper into my briefcase when the doorbell rang.

 

(D)

It was a bill collector from the local cable-TV company.

 

(E)

Shouldn’t have been home that afternoon eight years ago, but I had forgotten a term paper and was close to missing the 3pm deadline.

 

(F)

After all, I was a student of library science, and keeping track of papers was supposed to be my specialty.

   

(a) ECDBAF

(b) CDBAFE

   

(c) ECDABF

(d) CDBFEA

   

(e) CBADEF

   

51.

(A)

If you’re like me, your toughest decisions will come in your reference files.

 

(B)

My personal rule of thumb is that if I haven’t used a piece of information for two years, I get rid of it.

 

(C)

Of course, it’s a law of nature that whenever you finally get rid of something, you will always need it the very next day.

 

(D)

I recommend going through your files once a year, discarding information that is old or out-of-date.

   

(a) DBAC

(b) DABC

   

(c) CBAD

(d) BADC

   

(e) ABCD

   

52.

(A)

I placed my new treadmill in the middle of our family room to encourage myself to use it.

 

(B)

“No one,” Julia replied in her most convincing tone. “Not even my mum.”

 

(C)

My children knew they were not to touch it, but their friends often gravitated to it.

 

(D)

Months after I bought the treadmill, I knew I had been remiss in my fitness plan but didn’t realize how much until my five-years-old daughter Julia had her friend Makenzie over to play.

 

(E)

From a nearby room I heard Julia say, “That’s Mummy’s treadmill, and no one is allowed to use it.”

 

(F)

“No one?” asked her friend.

   

(a) ACDFBE

(b) ACDBFE

   

(c) ACDEFB

(d) DCAFBE

   

(e) ABCDEF

   

53.

(A)

Wasting little time, he started T.T. Pond Company and began commercially marketing the product.

 

(B)

A druggist by profession and a businessman in the making, he was amazed by the curative powers of an extract made using the witch hazel shrub.

 

(C)

1907 proved to be a major turning point, with the addition of Ponds Cold Cream, legendary classic even today.

 

(D)

T.T. Pond did not imagine the success his little trip during 1846 to a remote Indian settlement in upstate New York would create.

 

(E)

It was called thus because of the cooling effect evaporation caused on the skin.

   

(a) DBACE

(b) DBCEA

   

(c) ABCDE

(d) ACBDE

   

(e) ADBCE

   

54.

(A)

Nunes is taking me down Transpanteneria Highway, a 150-kilometer ribbon of red dirt and 127 plank bridges, that runs south form Pocone to Porto Jofre.

 

(B)

They used soil from alongside the highway, leaving trenches filled with water and fish that attract other animals in abundance.

 

(C)

As a result, the Transpantaneira Highway may offer the greatest wildlife show on earth.

 

(D)

The engineers who built this raised the surface about four meters from then surrounding terrain to keep it dry during the rainy season.

   

(a) DBAC

(b) DBCA

   

(c) ADBC

(d) BCAD

   

(e) BACD

   

55.

(A)

Strutting and vaguely comic, two female rheas head for nests where their two males guard the eggs with menacing looks.

 

(B)

My host, cattle rancher Jose Tocqueville de Carvalho Neta, says that the rheas will occasionally rearrange the eggs in the nest.

 

(C)

The Ostrich-like birds are here in front of the Campo Neta Lodge, a five-room Mexican farm house in the middle of the Pantanal.

 

(D)

“This happens so they will not take the sun in only one position.”

   

(a) ABCD

(b) ACBD

   

(c) ADCB

(d) ABDC

   

(e) CABD

   

56.

(A)

But, transportation is difficult and the Pantanal is little known outside of Brazil.

 

(B)

The people who live here have their fingers crossed.

 

(C)

Because if ecotourism doesn’t work, an alternative is waiting.

 

(D)

There are now some 60-tourist facilities here, most of them small and locally owned

 

(E)

Worldwide, the jury is still out on the idea of ecotourism and the Pantanal has become a testing ground

   

(a) EDABC

(b) DAEBC

   

(c) ECBAD

(d) EDCBA

   

(e) ABCDE

   

57.

(A)

Carolina Coelho sits up in her saddle, turns 90 degrees and points to a stately umbauba tree.

 

(B)

“Toucans feed on the eggs and nestling of other birds,” my guide says.

 

(C)

“So they make a lot of enemies”

 

(D)

Shading my eyes with my hand, I still can’t see the creature until it flies off with a dozen smaller birds in pursuit.

 

(E)

“Toucan,” she says.

   

(a) ADBCE

(b) AEDBC

   

(c) ACDEB

(d) ADECB

   

(e) ABCDE

   

58.

(A)

The subject has two half ping-pong balls taped over his eyes and wears headphones that emit a roar of static—he is in a sensory cocoon, a uniform field of light and sound.

 

(B)

This is so he can pick up psychic signals without distraction.

 

(C)

On the top floor of the psychology department building at Edinburgh University, Professor Robert Morris and his team are performing an experiment.

 

(D)

You read that right: psychic signals.

   

(a) CABD

(b) BCDA

   

(c) ABCD

(d) DABC

   

(e) ADBC

   

59.

(A)

On a cold day in Tornato I meet Professor James Alcock at York University, one of the most widely respected skeptics.

 

(B)

“I have a lot of respect for the leading parapsychologist I know personally,” he says.

 

(C)

Alcock has spent decades analyzing the procedures used by parapsychologists and advising on how to make them watertight.

 

(D)

“In a few cases, we’ve gone through the same research report and independently come up with the same flaws, usually statistical errors.”

   

(a) ABCD

(b) ACBD

   

(c) DCBA

(d) DCAB

   

(e) ADBC

   

60.

(A)

He has set up the James Randi Educational Foundation to challenge believers to prove their statements about paranormal abilities.

 

(B)

If someone chases will-o’-the-wisps like speaking with the dead, it subverts them from things that could really help them.

 

(C)

So if the paranormal consists of nothing more than occasionally being able to sense that someone is staring at us, does it matter if science accept the parapsychologists’ results or not.

 

(D)

Randi is adamant it does.

   

(a) BACD

(b) ACDB

   

(c) DCBA

(d) BCDA

   

(e) ABCD

   

61.

(A)

Four-year-old Evan Petropoulos has a serious infection.

 

(B)

So it might be tough to comprehend why the little guy is giggling like a maniac.

 

(C)

The infection has swollen Evan’s right eye shut and put him in considerable pain.

 

(D)

He’s in the hospital with an IV in his arm.

   

(a) ACDB

(b) CBAD

   

(c) BDAC

(d) ADCB

   

(e) DABC

   

62.

(A)

Using humour to ease pain and help healing is no laughing matter to a growing number of doctors, nurses and health care workers.

 

(B)

We all know that it feels great to engage in a good laugh, but a small yet significant body of research suggests that the ability to see life from the lighter side may be medicinal.

 

(C)

And even help diabetics control their blood sugar.

 

(D)

Studies have hinted that humour can alleviate allergy symptoms, increase pain tolerance, bolster the disease-fighting immune system, reduce the risk of stroke and heart attack.

   

(a) ADCB

(b) ADBC

   

(c) ABDC

(d) DACB

   

(e) ABCD

   

63.

(A)

That’s where Jennifer Lopez, the daughter of Puerto Rican immigrants, got her start, singing and dancing in neighborhood shows in New York City.

 

(B)

She’s dressed all in white—squeaky-clean running shoes and velour track suit she designed herself, with a “J. Lo” insignia over the breast.

 

(C)

She’s come a long way from the Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club.

 

(D)

Today she’s in Vancouver, filming An Unfinished Life, in which she teams up with Robert Redford.

   

(a) DBCA

(b) ADBC

   

(c) CDAB

(d) CADB

   

(e) ABCD

   

64.

(A)

Wandering along the streets of New York city, my daughters and I stop at shoe stores wherever we happen to be.

 

(B)

This is their choice, these women who as little girls teetered around the house balancing like cranes in my mother’s high heels.

 

(C)

I sit on a bench and wait while they try on shoe after shoe, readjusting their positions in the mirror, eyes down cast, considering their feet.

 

(D)

“So?” one of them will ask me. “What do you think of these?”

   

(a) ADBC

(b) DBCA

   

(c) ABCD

(d) DCBA

   

(e) CABD

   

65.

(A)

And long before anyone in my class had heard of ballroom dancing, my mother played swing music on the gramophone in the living room, took me in her arms and taught me how.

 

(B)

By age 12, after a series of operations, I could walk unaided.

 

(C)

By the time I was seven, my mother had moved on to tennis, which she decided I could play while wearing black galoshes over my brown orthopedic shoes.

 

(D)

When I turned 15, she signed me up for dancing school with boys.

   

(a) CABD

(b) CBDA

   

(c) CDAB

(d) CBAD

   

(e) CDBA

   

66.

(A)

If my husband, Ed, had his way, you could pop by our place any given night and see me sitting in bed, struggling to hold my head up under the weight of a night-vision headset.

 

(B)

Ed is an early-to-sleep sort of chap, who’ll announce around 8 pm “just going to change into my pajamas and read for a while.”

 

(C)

Once he becomes horizontal, however, it’s pretty much over.

 

(D)

This makes it difficult for yours truly, for I really do read in bed, including the part where you turn the page and read a second one and then a third one.

   

(a) BACD

(b) ACBD

   

(c) BCAD

(d) ABCD

   

(e) ADBC

   

67.

(A)

We call it Pillow Mountain.

 

(B)

I roll over in the middle of the night and find myself suffocating against a towering mound of goose down.

 

(C)

I offered to stop eating in bed if Ed would agree to wean himself from his need for multiple pillows.

 

(D)

A married couple can best be defined as a unit of people whose sleep habits are carefully engineered to keep each other awake.

   

(a) DABC

(b) DCBA

   

(c) ABCD

(d) ACBD

   

(e) ADBC

   

68.

(A)

It’s that rare state when it seems you can do no wrong.

 

(B)

You know the feeling.

 

(C)

Maybe you’re playing tennis and every shot is landing right where you aim it.

 

(D)

Or perhaps solutions to those gnarly work problems are coming to you so easily that you wonder why they seemed insurmountable before.

 

(E)

Why is it that sometimes you fire on all cylinders and at other times you can’t even start the engine?

 

(F)

For most of us, these moments of visions and high performance are too rare.

 

(G)

The answer may be this: You’re at your best when you get your mind out of the way.

   

(a) BACDFEG

(b) FEGBAC

   

(c) CDEGFBA

(d) AFEGDCB

   

(e) ABCDEFG

   

69.

(A)

Every bit of his well-muscled arms is covered with tattoos.

 

(B)

Today Kent Lindahl is the father of two children, has finished college, and is working towards a degree in psychotherapy.

 

(C)

Yet fragments of his past will always haunt him.

 

(D)

With his intelligent eyes, neatly trimmed beard and wire-rimmed glasses, Lindahl looks like a professor—until he rolls up his sleeves.

   

(a) BDCA

(b) BCDA

   

(c) DCBA

(d) DBCA

   

(e) ABCD

   

70.

(A)

Amberry teaches professional basketball players how to shoot free throws and has produced an instructional book and video.

 

(B)

The key, he says, is to become mentally absorbed in a physical routine, which clears the head of negative ideas, such as missing the shot.

 

(C)

“You can’t have an extraneous thought in your mind when you make that free throw,” says Amberry.

 

(D)

Refocusing the mind to eliminate the buzz and the static of everyday thought, according to a new book by Dr Herbert Benson, has powers beyond the basketball court.

   

(a) ACBD

(b) ABCD

   

(c) CABD

(d) CBDA

   

(e) BACD

   

71.

(A)

So she took her dog, Elsie Mae, for a stroll on the beach near her home in California.

 

(B)

Of course, some people seem to know intuitively that the best way to cope with a problem can be to walk away from it.

 

(C)

Artist and graphic designer Lisa Gizara, 43, was struggling to come up with a fresh advertising idea for one of her clients, a computer company.

 

(D)

She took a few more steps, and saw an image: Michelangelo’s “Creations of Adam,” which features the famous detail of God’s and Adam’s fingers nearly touching.

 

(E)

As they tromped across the sand, suddenly a phrase popped into Gizara’s head: “Get connected.”

   

(a) DACEB

(b) EDCBA

   

(c) CDAEB

(d) BCAED

   

(e) ABCDE

   

72.

(A)

Benson believes that when you “break the train of everyday thought”—a phrase he repeats like a mantra—your body increases production of a gas molecule called nitric oxide (not to be confused with nitrous oxide, or laughing gas).

 

(B)

Scientists once thought nitric oxide, or NO, was merely a toxin.

 

(C)

It’s a component of cigarette smoke, for example.

 

(D)

But in the late 1980s, researchers learned that the gas is made in the human body and plays a role in a range of physiological processes, such as controlling blood pressure.

   

(a) ACBD

(b) ABCD

   

(c) BDCA

(d) BCDA

   

(e) DABC

   

73.

(A)

Many of his colleagues told him he was wasting his time and would ruin his career.

 

(B)

But Benson went on to become a pioneer in the now-nourishing field known as mind-body medicine, which explores how our thoughts and feelings contribute to disease.

 

(C)

Benson has grown accustomed to skepticism about his work.

 

(D)

Trained as a cardiologist at Harvard Medical School, Benson began in the 1960s to study how stress affects physical well being, then considered a radical idea.

   

(a) CDAB

(b) CBAD

   

(c) CDBA

(d) CABD

   

(e) BACD

   

74.

(A)

To the soundtrack of cicadas and the wind in the leaves, Abrams repeated the motions, over and over, until her brain and body went on autopilot.

 

(B)

“It’s a very Zen kind of thing.”

 

(C)

She would sit in the night air for hours, slowly rocking the treadle of a spinning wheel with her feet and guiding the fibres with sweeping motions of her arm.

 

(D)

Consider Charlene Abrams, who spent every free evening in the summer of 1994 on the front step of her home, spinning yarn.

 

(E)

“You get into this almost altered state,” says Abrams, 43, a software engineer.

 

(F)

“Sitting there spinning, my mind wanders and goes wherever it needs to go.”

   

(a) ABCDEF

(b) ACFBED

   

(c) DCABEF

(d) DACBEF

   

(e) FABEDC

   

75.

(A)

And then suppose you pushed the ‘Reverse’ button and took a trip in the opposite direction—journeying into the dim recesses of the past.

 

(B)

Just suppose you could clamber aboard a Time Machine and press the ‘Forward’ button.

 

(C)

You might just land right into your favorite period of history.

 

(D)

Z..a.Ap..Would you hurtle forward through a blinding flash of days and nights, months and years—even long centuries—perhaps, to land into an alien world of the future…?

 

(E)

A world that will be a marvel of technology.

   

(a) CDABE

(b) CBADE

   

(c) BDEAC

(d) BDECA

   

(e) DABCE

   

76.

(A)

Could you think of a world without time?

 

(B)

It all sounds too good to be true, or even practical for that matter, does it not?

 

(C)

To be able to play on endlessly without being told that it was time to go home…

 

(D)

For a world without time would probably be a totally chaotic place to live in, where everything happened all at once—a kind of topsy-turvy land!

 

(E)

Imagine what it would be like not to have to tumble out of bed to the shrill buzz of the morning alarm and to hurry to catch the school bus!

   

(a) AECBD

(b) AECDB

   

(c) CDBAE

(d) ECBDA

   

(e) DECBA

   

77.

(A)

It covers 1, 86,000 miles per second.

 

(B)

This means you would zoom more than seven times around the world in one second!

 

(C)

Light travels at an enormous speed, faster than anything else we know.

 

(D)

The distance will be about 58, 80,000,000,000 miles. This distance is called a light year.

 

(E)

It has a speed more than 5, 00,000 times faster than the Concorde. Now calculate how far light will travel in a year.

   

(a) CEABD

(b) CEDAB

   

(c) CABDE

(d) CABED

   

(e) CBADE

   

78.

(A)

Small distance, such as the length and breadth of this book, are measured in centimeters or inches.

 

(B)

Even millions or billions of miles would not be enough to express these immense distances. We need an altogether different unit for measuring them.

 

(C)

However, sizes and distance in the universe are too vast to be measured in terms of any of these units.

 

(D)

Bigger distances are measured in meters or feet, while still bigger distances are measured in terms of any of these units.

 

(E)

The stars of our galaxy whirl together in space in a gigantic spiral, so vast that ordinary words for describing hugeness just cannot describe this.

   

(a) ABCDE

(b) ADBEC

   

(c) ADCBE

(d) ADCEB

   

(e) AEBCD

   

79.

(A)

In ancient times, man had a very simple picture of the universe.

 

(B)

He believed that the sun, moon, stars, and planets were small objects that moved round the earth.

 

(C)

The universe was taken to be a great dome overhead having glittering lights.

 

(D)

Below, in the centre of all creation, lay the vast, flat, immovable earth, around which everything else moved.

   

(a) ABCD

(b) ABDC

   

(c) ACBD

(d) ACDB

   

(e) CABD

   

80.

(A)

Then the earth turned green and joyful, the birds sang and flowers bloomed. And then came the blazing, hot summer when the earth became parched and dry, and everything dried up.

 

(B)

The cold, windy winter when man huddled before a fire to keep himself warm was followed by spring.

 

(C)

The monsoons provided some solace from the heat. And leaves fell off the trees in autumn before winter came once again.

 

(D)

This cycle of seasons covered about 365 days or a whole year.

 

(E)

It is likely that the change in seasons gave birth to the idea of the year.

   

(a) EBACD

(b) BACDE

   

(c) EDBAC

(d) CABED

   

(e) ABCDE

   

81.

(A)

At night it disappears altogether from our sight.

 

(B)

It is we who have moved!

 

(C)

Just as it appeared to our ancestors, the sun seems to us to rise in the east and journey across the vast archway of the sky before setting in the west.

 

(D)

This movement does not actually happen, but appears to do so.

 

(E)

The sun at night is in exactly the same place as it was during the day.

   

(a) CEABD

(b) CADBE

   

(c) CABED

(d) CADEB

   

(e) BCEAD

   

82.

(A)

The shadow clock was a clever invention, although not a very accurate timekeeper.

 

(B)

It was a fairly simple device, consisting of a straight base placed in an east to west direction, on which stood a crosspiece.

 

(C)

This crosspiece was placed at the east end of the base in the morning, and shifted to the west end in the afternoon.

 

(D)

As the sun’s rays fell on the crosspiece, it cast its shadow on the base.

 

(E)

This was marked by a scale of six time divisions, so intervals of time could be measured.

   

(a) ABCDE

(b) ABECD

   

(c) ABCED

(d) CABED

   

(e) DACBE

   

83.

(A)

If the water level fell to the next mark, it showed that the clock had run for two hours.

 

(B)

In this way, as marks were exposed, the time could be read.

 

(C)

To start the clock, the vessel was filled to the brim with water. As the water ran out through the hole in the bottom, the level of water in the vessel kept falling.

 

(D)

The water-clock was actually a basin shaped, stone vessel with a small hole at the bottom. Its inner walls were marked with divisions to show the hours, so the ‘clock’ was easy to read.

 

(E)

When the water level dropped to the first mark on the walls, it indicated that the clock had been running for one hour.

   

(a) DEACB

(b) DECAB

   

(c) DCBEA

(d) DCEAB

   

(e) DBCEA

   

84.

(A)

The ancient Greek philosopher Plato invented an ingenious alarm clock by fitting a siphon (a bent tube used to transfer liquids from one vessel to another) to a water-clock.

 

(B)

Plato effectively used this device to summon his pupils for classes at the unearthly hour of 4 a.m..

 

(C)

Since this had to be set six hours beforehand, Plato probably did not get much sleep himself as he set about adjusting it!

 

(D)

As soon as the water was level with the top of the siphon, it ran down a tube into a vessel below so quickly that the air in it was compressed, and escaped through a pipe with a piercing whistle.

 

(E)

It is not likely that they could have continued to sleep once their alarm clock went off.

   

(a) ABDEC

(b) ADBEC

   

(c) ABCDE

(d) ADBCE

   

(e) ACBED

   

85.

(A)

When the sand has run through from one glass vessel to the other, the egg is hardboiled.

 

(B)

Today, if you want to boil an egg for three minutes and you have an egg-timer or three minute sandglass, you cannot really go wrong.

 

(C)

Start the sand ‘clock’ as soon as you have dropped the egg into boiling water in the fire.

 

(D)

But if you are impatient and do not wait for the sand to run right through, you will have to eat a rather ‘gooey’ egg.

 

(E)

If, on the other hand, the egg keeps boiling after the sandglass has run through, you will have to chew a very hard-boiled egg indeed!

   

(a) BAECD

(b) BECAD

   

(c) BCADE

(d) BADCE

   

(e) BACED

   

86.

(A)

It was taken from the French word Cloche which means a bell.

 

(B)

French was widely spoken by the English upper classes, and many English words were ‘borrowed’ from it.

 

(C)

In fact, even before mechanical clocks existed, churches and monasteries rang bells to tell the common folk that it was time for prayers.

 

(D)

Bells were, therefore, associated with clocks in those early days of mechanical timekeeping.

 

(E)

The word ‘clock’ or ‘cloch’ as it was called in Middle English, goes back to this time.

   

(a) EABDC

(b) BACDE

   

(c) EABCD

(d) EACDB

   

(e) CABDE

   

87.

(A)

With the twentieth century, time had to be much more exact.

 

(B)

After all, it had to keep pace with the new science and technology that was sweeping the modern world.

 

(C)

Even one-hundredth of a second mattered in fields like astronomy.

 

(D)

Accuracy no longer meant keeping time to the half minute or even second.

   

(a) ABDC

(b) ABCD

   

(c) DCBA

(d) DCAB

   

(e) DABC

   

88.

(A)

These were really our earliest calendars.

 

(B)

They simply used sticks with crude notches in them to count the days, or strings with knots in them to keep a record of so many full moons or even seasons.

 

(C)

In those far-off days, there were no fancy calendars like the one you have hung up in your room to keep track of the year.

 

(D)

They probably called a number of days so many ‘dawns’ or ‘suns’.

 

(E)

Ancient tribes used a dawn-to-dawn reckoning to count the days.

   

(a) EDCAB

(b) EDCBA

   

(c) CEDBA

(c) CAEDB

   

(e) ABCDE

   

89.

(A)

Every calendar welcomes the first day of the year as the ‘NEW YEAR’. This is one of the oldest and gayest customs of mankind, and is celebrated the world over.

 

(B)

New Year’s day is a great time for parties and reunions that ring out the old year and ring in the new one.

 

(C)

It is a time to make New Year ‘resolutions’ as well, though these are soon forgotten!

 

(D)

In the bigger cities of the world, many people collect in a big square to welcome the New Year. They greet each other and embrace each other.

 

(E)

In London, Trafalgar Square is the traditional gathering place, while Times Square is popular in New York.

   

(a) ABCED

(b) ADECB

   

(c) ABCDE

(d) BCDEA

   

(e) AEBCD

   

90.

(A)

At sixteen, Mamie was something of a knockout.

 

(B)

She had wide blue eyes, a pert nose, soft brown hair worn long with a dip over her high forehead, and one of the most infectious smiles around.

 

(C)

As the prettiest Doud girl, she drew many young men to the house on Saturday afternoons and Sunday evenings, when they would gather around the piano to sing.

 

(D)

All this was coupled with a gaiety of personality, an honesty and a directness that were most appealing.

   

(a) DCBA

(b) ACDB

   

(c) CDAB

(d) ABDC

   

(e) DABC

   

91.

(A)

He was about to receive an honorary degree of Doctor of Laws.

 

(B)

In 1948, he would assume the presidency of Columbia.

 

(C)

Precisely at four o’ clock on a snow February afternoon in 1947, Dwight David Eisenhower, in full military uniform, walked down the aisle in the great rotunda of Law Memorial Library at Columbia University in New York City.

 

(D)

In 1945, he had returned in triumph from Europe, where he had served as Supreme Commander of the Allied Expeditionary Forces.

   

(a) CDAB

(b) BDAC

   

(c) ACBD

(d) CABD

   

(e) ABCD

   

92.

(A)

After all, he was only a soldier and a poor boy, and everybody felt he was marrying above his ‘class’.

 

(B)

and….people felt she could have done a good deal better.

 

(C)

“The Douds were well off financially,”

 

(D)

When the engagement of Dwight David Eisenhower and Mamie Doud was announced in Denver, neighbours were astounded at Mamie’s choice.

   

(a) ABDC

(b) DCBA

   

(c) ACBD

(d) CBDA

   

(e) ABCD

   

93.

(A)

At the end of their lives, it could truly be said that they loved each other more than on the day they first met.

 

(B)

Yet the steadfast devotion and mutual respect of the general and his lady carried them through the travails of World War II and on to the triumphs of the White House.

 

(C)

Ike and Mamie had no such misgivings as they took their vows—or throughout their warm and loving marriage of almost fifty-three years.

 

(D)

Innumerable army-ordered separations, the tragic loss of their first son, and the rumors on two continents of Ike’s involvement with another woman were almost devastating.

 

(E)

The way was not always smooth.

   

(a) ABECD

(b) CEDBA

   

(c) CDEBA

(d) BCADE

   

(e) ABCDE

   

94.

(A)

Mother Morag not only saw them, she deliberately came up to her cell to watch them—her window overlooked the road—but this was not Dilbury, England, not the mists and freshness of the downs.

 

(B)

There, the first sound was the bird chorus, especially larks; here, the first sound was cawing of crows.

 

(C)

Early every morning of each racing season, Mother Morag, Reverend Mother of the Sisters of our lady of poverty, saw the string go by, a line of horses, brown, bay, chestnut—worst of all colors—in the heat; now and again a roan, or a dappled gray.

 

(D)

In winter, there was mist, but it swirled above arid dust, because this was Calcutta, India, and the string was not Michael Traherne’s— Michael, friend of royalty and other famous owners—it was John Quillan’s, he who had defiantly chosen to drop out.

   

(a) CBAD

(b) ABDC

   

(c) BACD

(d) CABD

   

(e) ABCD

   

95.

(A)

They had to wait in the outer kitchens, among squalid washing up, shouting, horseplay.

 

(B)

The night round was hard, not only on the sisters but on Solomon and Gulab.

 

(C)

Solomon often had to stand for half an hour–some restaurants seemed to take pleasure in keeping the sisters waiting—and in the cold-weather months, Solomon and Gulab shivered.

 

(D)

The sisters, too, often met with contempt.

   

(a) BCAD

(b) ADCB

   

(c) DCBA

(d) BADC

   

(e) ABCD

   

96.

(A)

Ted raised his head.

 

(B)

He was sitting where he had sat for most of the last two days, at the desk in the darkest corner of the darkened room.

 

(C)

He had kept the shutters closed.

 

(D)

There was nothing on the desk now; the photograph of him and Ella in her “lace curtain” had been shut away in the drawer, as had been the framed form of his new license.

   

(a) ADBC

(b) BCAD

   

(c) ABCD

(d) DACB

   

(e) CABD

   

97.

(A)

My sense of direction wasn’t clear, and at first, I didn’t know where we were going.

 

(B)

We left the car in the almost empty parking area and walked once more into a world of perfect beauty and harmony.

 

(C)

Beside me, Rick was quiet, though tension showed in his hands on the wheel.

 

(D)

Not until I saw the lighted bell tower of Tlaquepaque did I realize where we were.

   

(a) ACDB

(b) DCAB

   

(c) CBDA

(d) ADCB

   

(e) BACD

   

98.

(A)

Without a pause he rushed outside to search the vicinity.

 

(B)

When Rick came back, I started, as though I’d been in a trance.

 

(C)

I followed him into the shop, and just when we stepped inside, a sound came back from the back, as if something had been knocked over in the darkness.

 

(D)

It was a while before he returned, his effort futile.

 

(E)

He ran into the rear rooms, and I waited tensely among the counters, remembering the desecrated blue cloth upstairs.

 

(F)

Rick flicked switches, and the shop blazed with light.

   

(a) CFEBAD

(b) CEFABD

   

(c) BACEFA

(d) CBFEDA

   

(e) BDCEAF

   

99.

(A)

The boy looked puzzled and disappointed.

 

(B)

As he walked down the path, a park Service ranger heard him blurt out to his mother, “But it looks just like Grandma’s house!”

 

(C)

It does, and it did.

 

(D)

In 1980, when the Eisenhower Gettysburg farm was opened to the public, a young boy and his mother emerged after a tour of the stone and brick house on the edge of the Civil War battlefield.

   

(a) ACDB

(b) DACB

   

(c) CBDA

(d) DABC

   

(e) ABDC

   

100.

(A)

“Johnny, how do you keep so lean?”

 

(B)

Mr. Leventine did not lunch there either—anyone thinking of inviting him would have been quietly persuaded not to by the club secretary, “as they would with me,” John could have said, for a different reason.”

 

(C)

Mr. Leventine had once lamented. John gritted his teeth.

 

(D)

The Bengal club had the best food east of Suez and a renowned wine cellar.

 

(E)

“Sweat,” said John, “and I don’t lunch at the Bengal Club.”

 

(F)

He detested the nickname.

   

(a) EFBDCA

(b) ACFEDB

   

(c) CFAEDB

(d) DEAFBC

   

(e) ABCDEF

   

101.

(A)

He was arriving tomorrow and she hadn’t finished her programme.

 

(B)

The school inspector.

 

(C)

Too late.

 

(D)

She snuggled down in her bed, hoping to push the worry away for a little longer.

 

(E)

She knew there was something unpleasant in her memory and that it would be in her consciousness in seconds.

 

(F)

Sally Jones opened her eyes at seven a.m. that May 8 and looked at the rust stain on the ceiling.

   

(a) FEBCDA

(b) EBADCF

   

(c) FEDCBA

(d) DCFEBA

   

(e) EFABCD

   

102.

(A)

It was the school inspector and another person, unknown to them.

 

(B)

A car pulled up, and two men got out and walked toward the little group.

 

(C)

Sally was reading aloud.

 

(D)

Magpies called from the pepper tree and, high above, an eagle circled, watching for prey, barely moving its wings.

 

(E)

Later that day, the children and their teacher were sitting on the grass in the warm winter sun.

   

(a) EDCBA

(b) ABEDC

   

(c) EDABC

(d) DCEAB

   

(e) ABCDE

   

103.

(A)

Gabrielle Lord published her first novel, Fortress, to instant acclaim in her native Australia.

 

(B)

The eldest of six children, she grew up in Sydney and attended the University of New England, in Armidle, New South Wales.

 

(C)

Success did not come easily, however.

 

(D)

Writing appealed to her even as a child—she was composing stories at nine.

 

(E)

But it wasn’t until she was thirty that she completed her first book, a literary novel that was rejected by every publishing firm to which it was sent.

   

(a) ADBCE

(b) CDEBA

   

(c) ACBDE

(d) DEBAC

   

(e) ABCDE

   

104.

(A)

I can still hear Mother calling from the staircase landing,” Marry, is your light out?”

 

(B)

Then I would set the alarm so that in the morning I could get up early, fix a cup of hot cocoa and snuggle back in bed for a blissful hour with my current book.

 

(C)

Yes, it was—but the streetlight in front of my window threw a very satisfactory beam on my pillow, and most evenings I would manage to sneak in a little extra reading.

 

(D)

It was heaven!

   

(a) ABCD

(b) DABC

   

(c) BCAD

(d) ACBD

   

(e) CABD

   

105.

(A)

From halfway up that hill, one can see on the clear autumn day most of the majesty that is Washington.

 

(B)

Across the muddy Potomac from the Lincoln Memorial a gentle slope rises gradually to what was once the home of Robert E. Lee.

 

(C)

The three marble monuments and memorials––to the men who forged in the Presidency an instrument of power and compassion—remind a grateful nation that it has been blessed in its gravest trials with its greatest leaders.

 

(D)

In the distance, the dome of the capital covers a milieu of wisdom and folly, Presidential ambitions and antagonisms, political ideals and ideologies.

   

(a) CABD

(b) BACD

   

(c) BCAD

(d) DABC

   

(e) ABCD

   

106.

(A)

The senator never wore a ring, a diamond stickpin or any jewellery other than an ordinary watch and tie clasp.

 

(B)

But he was not ashamed of the fact that his father’s wealth had enabled him to present himself for public office without being financially dependent on powerful pressure groups.

 

(C)

His political campaigns, while costly, avoided the kind of lavish display (such as billboards, full-page advertisements or telethons) that might provoke charges of excess.

 

(D)

All his government salaries—as Congressman, Senator and President—he donated to charity, roughly half a million dollars.

   

(a) ADCB

(b) CDBA

   

(c) ACDB

(d) BCAD

   

(e) DABC

   

107.

(A)

Despite many similarities, each of the Kennedys differed from the Senator and from each other.

 

(B)

But they were bound by ties of genuine filial and fraternal affection, ties that were strengthened by family tragedy and pride.

 

(C)

But when it came to competing with the rest of the world, the warmth of their solidarity strengthened Jack and awed his adversaries.

 

(D)

They were all intensely competitive and at home, vied with each other.

   

(a) CDAB

(b) ABDC

   

(c) CDBA

(d) DCAB

   

(e) DABC

   

108.

(A)

Ever interested in history, he asked Senator Hayden what changes, if any, had occurred in that time, and the reply was: “New members did not speak in those days.”

 

(B)

He was too young, too liberal and too out spoken.

 

(C)

Senator Kennedy was never a full-fledged member of the Senate’s inner circle, the “club” whose influence has been exaggerated by both its defenders and its detractors.

 

(D)

Early in his first term, his participation in a floor debate caused him to move closer to the front from his seat in the back row, and he found himself temporarily sitting next to Senate “Dean” Carl Hayden, who had entered Congress more than forty years earlier.

   

(a) ACDB

(b) ABDC

   

(c) BCDA

(d) CBDA

   

(e) DABC

   

109.

(A)

The speech proved to be substantially, and in some ways distressingly prophetic in subsequent years, but it was bitterly criticized at the time in Washington as well as Paris.

 

(B)

A tremendous amount of staff research preceded every Kennedy talk.

 

(C)

He was known in the library of Congress as the heaviest borrower of their reference works.

 

(D)

One of the most carefully researched, widely publicized and officially ignored speeches Senator Kennedy ever delivered was his address in 1957, outlining the interest of America and the west in a negotiated solution of eventual self-determination in Algeria.

 

(E)

His same speech, he later discovered, was hailed throughout North Africa—and an American correspondent who visited the Algerian camp related to the Senator his surprise at being interviewed by weary grimy rebels on Kennedy’s chances for the Presidency.

 

(F)

He did not make as many major Senate speeches as some of his more vocal colleagues, nor did he measure his—or their—effectiveness by the publicity a speech was given.

   

(a) BDEFAC

(b) CDEAFB

   

(c) BCFDAE

(d) ADEFBC

   

(e) ABEDCF

   

110.

(A)

The only two other people in the house had been a servant who was drunk and a chauffeur enraged at the servant.

 

(B)

While they chased each other threatening murder, the then Senator sat alone with his crutches in deadly still air, watching nature’s fury swirl about him and wondering whether he would survive.

 

(C)

In 1961, he found himself once again in the eye of a hurricane.

 

(D)

John Kennedy once recalled with humor the day at Cape Cod when he sat handicapped by his bad back, in the eye of a New England hurricane.

   

(a) DABC

(b) CDAB

   

(c) DACB

(d) ACDB

   

(e) CABD

   

◊ Answer Key

1. (a)

2. (b)

3. (a)

4. (b)

5. (a)

6. (d)

7. (b)

8. (b)

9. (a)

10. (a)

11. (d)

12. (b)

13. (a)

14. (b)

15. (b)

16. (c)

17. (b)

18. (d)

19. (a)

20. (a)

21. (c)

22. (b)

23. (c)

24. (b)

25. (a)

26. (c)

27. (a)

28. (a)

29. (d)

30. (b)

31. (b)

32. (c)

33. (a)

34. (c)

35. (c)

36. (c)

37. (b)

38. (a)

39. (b)

40. (d)

41. (b)

42. (c)

43. (c)

44. (c)

45. (a)

46. (a)

47. (b)

48. (c)

49. (a)

50. (c)

51. (b)

52. (c)

53. (a)

54. (c)

55. (b)

56. (a)

57. (b)

58. (a)

59. (b)

60. (d)

61. (d)

62. (c)

63. (d)

64. (c)

65. (a)

66. (d)

67. (b)

68. (a)

69. (b)

70. (b)

71. (d)

72. (b)

73. (a)

74. (c)

75. (c)

76. (a)

77. (d)

78. (d)

79. (a)

80. (a)

81. (d)

82. (a)

83. (d)

84. (b)

85. (c)

86. (a)

87. (a)

88. (b)

89. (c)

90. (d)

91. (d)

92. (b)

93. (b)

94. (d)

95. (a)

96. (c)

97. (d)

98. (a)

99. (d)

100. (b)

101. (c)

102. (a)

103. (c)

104. (d)

105. (b)

106. (a)

107. (b)

108. (d)

109. (c)

110. (a)